A null mutation in basigin, an immunoglobulin superfamily member, indicates its important roles in peri-implantation development and spermatogenesis

Tadahiko Igakura, Kenji Kadomatsu, Tadashi Kaname, Hisako Muramatsu, Qi Wen Fan, Teruo Miyauchi, Yoshiro Toyama, Naohiko Kuno, Shigeki Yuasa, Masahide Takahashi, Takao Senda, Osamu Taguchi, Ken Ichi Yamamura, Kimiyoshi Arimura, Takashi Muramatsu

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Abstract

Basigin is a highly glycosylated transmembrane protein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. We generated mutant mice lacking the basigin gene (Bsg) by gene targeting. Bsg (-/-) embryos developed normally during preimplantation stages. However, the majority of Bsg (-/-) embryos died around the time of implantation. At this time, basigin mRNA was strongly expressed in the trophectoderm, embryo proper, and uterine endometrium of Bsg (+/+) mice. These results suggest that basigin is involved in intercellular recognition during implantation. Embryos which survived the critical period yielded Bsg (-/-) mutant mice. Half of the mutant mice died before 1 month after birth, due to interstitial pneumonia. The surviving adult mutant mice were small and sterile. Spermatogenesis was arrested in the mutant mice. Most of the spermatocytes in the Bsg (-/-) mouse were arrested and degenerated at the metaphase of the first meiosis, and only a small number differentiated to step 1 spermatids. In the female mutants, the ovaries and genital tract were morphologically normal, and the defect was probably in the capability of implantation of the uterus. In conclusion, basigin is an important cell- surface molecule involved in early embryogenesis and reproduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-165
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume194
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15-02-1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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    Igakura, T., Kadomatsu, K., Kaname, T., Muramatsu, H., Fan, Q. W., Miyauchi, T., Toyama, Y., Kuno, N., Yuasa, S., Takahashi, M., Senda, T., Taguchi, O., Yamamura, K. I., Arimura, K., & Muramatsu, T. (1998). A null mutation in basigin, an immunoglobulin superfamily member, indicates its important roles in peri-implantation development and spermatogenesis. Developmental Biology, 194(2), 152-165. https://doi.org/10.1006/dbio.1997.8819