A therapeutic strategy to prevent morphine dependence and tolerance by coadministration of cAMP-related reagents with morphine

Akio Itoh, Yukihiro Noda, Takayoshi Mamiya, Takaaki Hasegawa, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Morphine is the most potent opioid analgesic currently available and its use is increasing for treatment of severe pain, however, long-term morphine exposure induces physical dependence/tolerance. Although the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been established, several biochemical changes including intracellular cAMP systems and Ca2+ mobilization have been suggested. To evaluate the contribution of cAMP, we investigated the effects of nefiracetam [N-(2,6-dimethyl-phenyl)-2(2-oxo-1- pyrrolidinyl)acetamide] and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, enprofylline and rolipram) on the development of morphine dependence/tolerance. Mice administered morphine (6 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.) twice daily for 5 days, showed withdrawal signs (jumping, diarrhea and body weight loss) after naloxone challenge (5 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating the physical dependence to morphine. Further, the tolerance to antinociceptive effect of morphine was observed in these mice on the tail-flick test. However, coadministration of nefiracetam (5 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.), enprofylline (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and rolipram (0.3 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) with morphine during the pretreatment period, significantly reduced the withdrawal signs, moreover, the tolerance was significantly attenuated. Acute administration of nefiracetam failed to reduce the withdrawal signs and did not affect the antinociceptive effect of morphine in morphine-naive mice. Theophylline (3 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.) tended to attenuate the development of morphine dependence/tolerance. The present findings suggest that coadministration of compounds which increase cAMP level with morphine may be a useful strategy to attenuate the development of morphine dependence/tolerance in the clinic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-625
Number of pages7
JournalMethods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Morphine Dependence
Morphine
Rolipram
Therapeutics
Theophylline
Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors
Naloxone
Opioid Analgesics
Tail
Weight Loss
Diarrhea
Body Weight
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Morphine is the most potent opioid analgesic currently available and its use is increasing for treatment of severe pain, however, long-term morphine exposure induces physical dependence/tolerance. Although the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been established, several biochemical changes including intracellular cAMP systems and Ca2+ mobilization have been suggested. To evaluate the contribution of cAMP, we investigated the effects of nefiracetam [N-(2,6-dimethyl-phenyl)-2(2-oxo-1- pyrrolidinyl)acetamide] and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, enprofylline and rolipram) on the development of morphine dependence/tolerance. Mice administered morphine (6 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.) twice daily for 5 days, showed withdrawal signs (jumping, diarrhea and body weight loss) after naloxone challenge (5 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating the physical dependence to morphine. Further, the tolerance to antinociceptive effect of morphine was observed in these mice on the tail-flick test. However, coadministration of nefiracetam (5 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.), enprofylline (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and rolipram (0.3 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) with morphine during the pretreatment period, significantly reduced the withdrawal signs, moreover, the tolerance was significantly attenuated. Acute administration of nefiracetam failed to reduce the withdrawal signs and did not affect the antinociceptive effect of morphine in morphine-naive mice. Theophylline (3 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.) tended to attenuate the development of morphine dependence/tolerance. The present findings suggest that coadministration of compounds which increase cAMP level with morphine may be a useful strategy to attenuate the development of morphine dependence/tolerance in the clinic.",
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A therapeutic strategy to prevent morphine dependence and tolerance by coadministration of cAMP-related reagents with morphine. / Itoh, Akio; Noda, Yukihiro; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

In: Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 20, No. 7, 01.09.1998, p. 619-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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