Accessory stimulus modulates executive function during stepping task

Tatsunori Watanabe, Soichiro Koyama, Shigeo Tanabe, Ippei Nojima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When multiple sensory modalities are simultaneously presented, reaction time can be reduced while interference enlarges. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of task-irrelevant acoustic accessory stimuli simultaneously presented with visual imperative stimuli on executive function during stepping. Executive functions were assessed by analyzing temporal events and errors in the initial weight transfer of the postural responses prior to a step (anticipatory postural adjustment errors). Eleven healthy young adults stepped forward in response to a visual stimulus. We applied a choice reaction time task and the Simon task, which consisted of congruent and incongruent conditions. Accessory stimuli were randomly presented with the visual stimuli. Compared with trials without accessory stimuli, the anticipatory postural adjustment error rates were higher in trials with accessory stimuli in the incongruent condition and the reaction times were shorter in trials with accessory stimuli in all the task conditions. Analyses after division of trials according to whether anticipatory postural adjustment error occurred or not revealed that the reaction times of trials with anticipatory postural adjustment errors were reduced more than those of trials without anticipatory postural adjustment errors in the incongruent condition. These results suggest that accessory stimuli modulate the initial motor programming of stepping by lowering decision threshold and exclusively under spatial incompatibility facil-itate automatic response activation. The present findings advance the knowledge of intersensory judgment processes during stepping and may aid in the development of intervention and evaluation tools for individuals at risk of falls.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA31
Pages (from-to)419-426
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume114
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-07-2015

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Social Adjustment
Executive Function
Acoustics
Young Adult
Weights and Measures
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology

Cite this

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Accessory stimulus modulates executive function during stepping task. / Watanabe, Tatsunori; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Nojima, Ippei.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 114, No. 1, A31, 01.07.2015, p. 419-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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