After-effects of pedaling exercise on spinal excitability and spinal reciprocal inhibition in patients with chronic stroke

Akira Tanuma, Toshiyuki Fujiwara, Tomofumi Yamaguchi, Takanori Ro, Hirotaka Arano, Shintaro Uehara, Kaoru Honaga, Masahiko Mukaino, Akio Kimura, Meigen Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of the study: To evaluate the after-effects of pedaling on spinal excitability and spinal reciprocal inhibition in patients with post-stroke spastic hemiparesis. Materials and methods: Twenty stroke patients with severe hemiparesis participated in this study and were instructed to perform 7 min of active pedaling and 7 min of passive pedaling with a recumbent ergometer at a comfortable speed. H reflexes and M waves of paretic soleus muscles were recorded at rest before, immediately after and 30 min after active and passive pedaling. The Hmax/Mmax ratio and H recruitment curve were measured. Reciprocal inhibition was assessed using the soleus H reflex conditioning test paradigm. Results: The Hmax/Mmax ratio was significantly decreased after active and passive pedaling exercise. The decreased Hmax/Mmax ratio after active pedaling lasted at least for 30 min. The H recruitment curve and reciprocal inhibition did not change significantly after active or passive pedaling exercise. Conclusions: Pedaling exercise decreased spinal excitability in patients with severe hemiparesis. Pedaling may be effective in rehabilitation following stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-79
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume127
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02-01-2017

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Foot
Stroke
Exercise
Paresis
H-Reflex
Muscle Spasticity
Skeletal Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tanuma, Akira ; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki ; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi ; Ro, Takanori ; Arano, Hirotaka ; Uehara, Shintaro ; Honaga, Kaoru ; Mukaino, Masahiko ; Kimura, Akio ; Liu, Meigen. / After-effects of pedaling exercise on spinal excitability and spinal reciprocal inhibition in patients with chronic stroke. In: International Journal of Neuroscience. 2017 ; Vol. 127, No. 1. pp. 73-79.
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abstract = "Purpose of the study: To evaluate the after-effects of pedaling on spinal excitability and spinal reciprocal inhibition in patients with post-stroke spastic hemiparesis. Materials and methods: Twenty stroke patients with severe hemiparesis participated in this study and were instructed to perform 7 min of active pedaling and 7 min of passive pedaling with a recumbent ergometer at a comfortable speed. H reflexes and M waves of paretic soleus muscles were recorded at rest before, immediately after and 30 min after active and passive pedaling. The Hmax/Mmax ratio and H recruitment curve were measured. Reciprocal inhibition was assessed using the soleus H reflex conditioning test paradigm. Results: The Hmax/Mmax ratio was significantly decreased after active and passive pedaling exercise. The decreased Hmax/Mmax ratio after active pedaling lasted at least for 30 min. The H recruitment curve and reciprocal inhibition did not change significantly after active or passive pedaling exercise. Conclusions: Pedaling exercise decreased spinal excitability in patients with severe hemiparesis. Pedaling may be effective in rehabilitation following stroke.",
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After-effects of pedaling exercise on spinal excitability and spinal reciprocal inhibition in patients with chronic stroke. / Tanuma, Akira; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Ro, Takanori; Arano, Hirotaka; Uehara, Shintaro; Honaga, Kaoru; Mukaino, Masahiko; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 127, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 73-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tanuma, Akira

AU - Fujiwara, Toshiyuki

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AU - Ro, Takanori

AU - Arano, Hirotaka

AU - Uehara, Shintaro

AU - Honaga, Kaoru

AU - Mukaino, Masahiko

AU - Kimura, Akio

AU - Liu, Meigen

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Y1 - 2017/1/2

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