Analysis of shedding of 3 β-herpesviruses in saliva from patients with connective tissue diseases

Tetsushi Yoshikawa, Masaru Ihira, Hiroaki Taguchi, Shunji Yoshida, Yoshizo Asano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Whether an association exists between infection with β-herpesviruses and connective tissue diseases remains unclear, as are the mechanisms for the regulation of these infections in the salivary glands. Methods. Human herpesvirus (HHV)-7 was isolated and viral DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serially collected saliva samples, to determine whether viral load correlated with infectivity. Then, to examine the role played by β-herpesviruses in connective tissue diseases, cytomegalovirus, HHV-6, and HHV-7 DNA loads were examined by real-time PCR in serially collected saliva samples from 21 patients with connective tissue diseases. Results. Although subjects with frequent HHV-7 shedding were more likely to have a high viral load than were other subjects, high viral loads were detected in saliva samples from a portion of the subjects with low viral shedding rates. No significant difference between the quantity of HHV-7 DNA in saliva samples from which active virus was isolated and that amplified from samples without detectable virus was observed. Patients with adult-onset Still disease consistently had high HHV-7 DNA loads, in contrast to patients with other connective tissue diseases (P = .0003) and healthy adults (P = .0224). The mean HHV-6 (P = .012) and HHV-7 (P < .0001) DNA loads in patients with connective tissue diseases were lower than those in healthy adults. Conclusion. These data suggest that a number of host factors in patients with adult-onset Still disease may function to accelerate HHV-7 replication in the salivary glands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1530-1536
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume192
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-11-2005

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Human Herpesvirus 7
Connective Tissue Diseases
Herpesviridae
Saliva
Viral Load
Adult-Onset Still's Disease
Human Herpesvirus 6
DNA
Salivary Glands
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Viruses
Virus Shedding
Herpesviridae Infections
Viral DNA
Cytomegalovirus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Analysis of shedding of 3 β-herpesviruses in saliva from patients with connective tissue diseases",
abstract = "Background. Whether an association exists between infection with β-herpesviruses and connective tissue diseases remains unclear, as are the mechanisms for the regulation of these infections in the salivary glands. Methods. Human herpesvirus (HHV)-7 was isolated and viral DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serially collected saliva samples, to determine whether viral load correlated with infectivity. Then, to examine the role played by β-herpesviruses in connective tissue diseases, cytomegalovirus, HHV-6, and HHV-7 DNA loads were examined by real-time PCR in serially collected saliva samples from 21 patients with connective tissue diseases. Results. Although subjects with frequent HHV-7 shedding were more likely to have a high viral load than were other subjects, high viral loads were detected in saliva samples from a portion of the subjects with low viral shedding rates. No significant difference between the quantity of HHV-7 DNA in saliva samples from which active virus was isolated and that amplified from samples without detectable virus was observed. Patients with adult-onset Still disease consistently had high HHV-7 DNA loads, in contrast to patients with other connective tissue diseases (P = .0003) and healthy adults (P = .0224). The mean HHV-6 (P = .012) and HHV-7 (P < .0001) DNA loads in patients with connective tissue diseases were lower than those in healthy adults. Conclusion. These data suggest that a number of host factors in patients with adult-onset Still disease may function to accelerate HHV-7 replication in the salivary glands.",
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Analysis of shedding of 3 β-herpesviruses in saliva from patients with connective tissue diseases. / Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Ihira, Masaru; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shunji; Asano, Yoshizo.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 192, No. 9, 01.11.2005, p. 1530-1536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Asano, Yoshizo

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N2 - Background. Whether an association exists between infection with β-herpesviruses and connective tissue diseases remains unclear, as are the mechanisms for the regulation of these infections in the salivary glands. Methods. Human herpesvirus (HHV)-7 was isolated and viral DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serially collected saliva samples, to determine whether viral load correlated with infectivity. Then, to examine the role played by β-herpesviruses in connective tissue diseases, cytomegalovirus, HHV-6, and HHV-7 DNA loads were examined by real-time PCR in serially collected saliva samples from 21 patients with connective tissue diseases. Results. Although subjects with frequent HHV-7 shedding were more likely to have a high viral load than were other subjects, high viral loads were detected in saliva samples from a portion of the subjects with low viral shedding rates. No significant difference between the quantity of HHV-7 DNA in saliva samples from which active virus was isolated and that amplified from samples without detectable virus was observed. Patients with adult-onset Still disease consistently had high HHV-7 DNA loads, in contrast to patients with other connective tissue diseases (P = .0003) and healthy adults (P = .0224). The mean HHV-6 (P = .012) and HHV-7 (P < .0001) DNA loads in patients with connective tissue diseases were lower than those in healthy adults. Conclusion. These data suggest that a number of host factors in patients with adult-onset Still disease may function to accelerate HHV-7 replication in the salivary glands.

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