Anatomy and Physiology of Feeding and Swallowing: Normal and Abnormal

Koichiro Matsuo, Jeffrey B. Palmer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

183 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eating and swallowing are complex behaviors involving volitional and reflexive activities of more than 30 nerves and muscles. They have two crucial biologic features: food passage from the oral cavity to stomach and airway protection. The swallowing process is commonly divided into oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal stages, according to the location of the bolus. The movement of the food in the oral cavity and to the oropharynx differs depending on the type of food (eating solid food versus drinking liquid). Dysphagia can result from a wide variety of functional or structural deficits of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or esophagus. The goal of dysphagia rehabilitation is to identify and treat abnormalities of feeding and swallowing while maintaining safe and efficient alimentation and hydration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-707
Number of pages17
JournalPhysical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-11-2008

Fingerprint

Deglutition
Anatomy
Mouth
Food
Deglutition Disorders
Eating
Oropharynx
Larynx
Pharynx
Esophagus
Drinking
Stomach
Rehabilitation
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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Anatomy and Physiology of Feeding and Swallowing : Normal and Abnormal. / Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

In: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.11.2008, p. 691-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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