Assessment of Surgical Outcomes in Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy Using the 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale: A Longitudinal Observational Study

Hiroki Takeda, Takehiro Michikawa, Sota Nagai, Soya Kawabata, Kei Ito, Daiki Ikeda, Nobuyuki Fujita, Shinjiro Kaneko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Locomotive syndrome caused by degenerative musculoskeletal diseases is reported to improve with surgical treatment. However, it is unclear whether surgical treatment is effective for the locomotive syndrome developing in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). Thus, this study primarily aimed to longitudinally assess the change in locomotive syndrome stage before and after cervical spinal surgery for patients with DCM using the 25-question geriatric locomotive function scale (GLFS-25). A secondary objective was to identify factors associated with the postoperative improvement in the locomotive syndrome stage. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of patients undergoing cervical spine surgery at our institution from April 2020 to May 2022 who had answered the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale, and GLFS-25 preoperatively and at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. We collected demographic data, medical history, preoperative radiographic parameters, presence or absence of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, and surgical data. Results: We enrolled 115 patients (78 men and 37 women) in the present study. Preoperatively, using the GLFS-25, 73.9% of patients had stage 3, 10.4% had stage 2, 9.6% had stage 1, 6.1% had no locomotive syndrome. The stage distribution of locomotive syndrome improved significantly at 6-months and 1-year postoperatively. The multivariable Poisson regression analysis revealed that better preoperative lower extremity function (relative risk: 3.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-8.8) was significantly associated with postoperative improvement in the locomotive syndrome stage. Conclusions: This is the first study to longitudinally assess the locomotive syndrome stage in patients with DCM using GLFS-25. Our results indicated that patients with DCM experienced significant improvement in the locomotive syndrome stage following cervical spine surgery. Particularly, the preoperative lower extremity function was significant in postoperative improvement in the locomotive syndrome stage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-296
Number of pages10
JournalSpine Surgery and Related Research
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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