Association between Death or Hospitalization and Observable Variables of Eating and Swallowing Function among Elderly Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

Maaya Takeda, Yutaka Watanabe, Kenshu Taira, Kazuhito Miura, Yuki Ohara, Masanori Iwasaki, Kayoko Ito, Junko Nakajima, Yasuyuki Iwasa, Masataka Itoda, Yasuhiro Nishi, Yoshihiko Watanabe, Masako Kishima, Hirohiko Hirano, Maki Shirobe, Shunsuke Minakuchi, Mitsuyoshi Yoshida, Yutaka Yamazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This 1-year multicenter prospective cohort study aimed to determine the association between observable eating and swallowing function factors and outcomes (death/hospitalization or survival) among elderly persons in long-term care insurance facilities in Japan. Baseline assessments of factors, such as language, drooling, halitosis, hypersalivation, tongue movement, perioral muscle function, coughing, respiration after swallowing, rinsing, and oral residue, among others, were conducted. A score of 0 was considered positive, and a score of 1 or 2 was considered negative. Patient age, sex, body mass index, Barthel index, and Clinical Dementia Rating were recorded. The death/hospitalization or survival rates over 1 year were recorded, and patients were allocated into groups depending on the respective outcome (death/hospitalization group or survival group) and baseline characteristics. A total of 986 residents from 32 facilities were included, with 216 in the death/hospitalization group and 770 in the survival group. Language, salivation, halitosis, perioral muscle, coughing, respiration after swallowing, rinsing, and oral residue were significantly associated with the outcomes (p < 0.05). Therefore, routine performance of these simple assessments by caregivers may allow early detection and treatment to prevent death, pneumonia, aspiration, and malnutrition in elderly persons.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1827
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07-2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

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