Association between resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session and mortality

A multicentre prospective cohort study

AICOPP group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Some observational studies of the general population showed that resting heart rate was associated with mortality. However, the relationship was unclear in dialysis patients. Methods: The study was a multicentre prospective cohort analysis including 1102 patients. Patients were classified into four groups based on resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session: <60/min; 60–79/min; 80–100/min; and ≥101/min. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) related mortality, and incidences of CV events after dialysis initiation were compared using the log-rank test. All-cause mortality rates for patients with heart rates <60, 60–79, and ≥101/min were compared to those for patients with heart rates 80–100/min, using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Moreover, we compared the outcomes among patients without use of β-blocker or heart failure symptom at the first dialysis session. Results: Significant differences were observed in the all-cause mortality rates among the four groups (P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis revealed that all-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with heart rate ≥ 101/min than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25–4.23). Subgroup analysis showed that among patients without use of b-blocker or heart failure symptom, all-cause mortality rates for those with heart rates ≥101/min were significantly higher than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (HR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.51–5.88, HR = 3.65, 95% CI: 1.59–8.36, respectively). Conclusion: The resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session was associated with all-cause mortality after dialysis initiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-468
Number of pages8
JournalNephrology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2018

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Dialysis
Cohort Studies
Heart Rate
Prospective Studies
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Heart Failure
Observational Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Incidence
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Cite this

@article{00e06e8bd29b47acb74e4aa7c90d6a22,
title = "Association between resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session and mortality: A multicentre prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Aim: Some observational studies of the general population showed that resting heart rate was associated with mortality. However, the relationship was unclear in dialysis patients. Methods: The study was a multicentre prospective cohort analysis including 1102 patients. Patients were classified into four groups based on resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session: <60/min; 60–79/min; 80–100/min; and ≥101/min. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) related mortality, and incidences of CV events after dialysis initiation were compared using the log-rank test. All-cause mortality rates for patients with heart rates <60, 60–79, and ≥101/min were compared to those for patients with heart rates 80–100/min, using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Moreover, we compared the outcomes among patients without use of β-blocker or heart failure symptom at the first dialysis session. Results: Significant differences were observed in the all-cause mortality rates among the four groups (P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis revealed that all-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with heart rate ≥ 101/min than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.30, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.25–4.23). Subgroup analysis showed that among patients without use of b-blocker or heart failure symptom, all-cause mortality rates for those with heart rates ≥101/min were significantly higher than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (HR = 2.98, 95{\%} CI: 1.51–5.88, HR = 3.65, 95{\%} CI: 1.59–8.36, respectively). Conclusion: The resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session was associated with all-cause mortality after dialysis initiation.",
author = "{AICOPP group} and Daijo Inaguma and Shigehisa Koide and Kazuo Takahashi and Hiroki Hayashi and Midori Hasegawa and Yukio Yuzawa",
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Association between resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session and mortality : A multicentre prospective cohort study. / AICOPP group.

In: Nephrology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 461-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session and mortality

T2 - A multicentre prospective cohort study

AU - AICOPP group

AU - Inaguma, Daijo

AU - Koide, Shigehisa

AU - Takahashi, Kazuo

AU - Hayashi, Hiroki

AU - Hasegawa, Midori

AU - Yuzawa, Yukio

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Aim: Some observational studies of the general population showed that resting heart rate was associated with mortality. However, the relationship was unclear in dialysis patients. Methods: The study was a multicentre prospective cohort analysis including 1102 patients. Patients were classified into four groups based on resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session: <60/min; 60–79/min; 80–100/min; and ≥101/min. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) related mortality, and incidences of CV events after dialysis initiation were compared using the log-rank test. All-cause mortality rates for patients with heart rates <60, 60–79, and ≥101/min were compared to those for patients with heart rates 80–100/min, using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Moreover, we compared the outcomes among patients without use of β-blocker or heart failure symptom at the first dialysis session. Results: Significant differences were observed in the all-cause mortality rates among the four groups (P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis revealed that all-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with heart rate ≥ 101/min than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25–4.23). Subgroup analysis showed that among patients without use of b-blocker or heart failure symptom, all-cause mortality rates for those with heart rates ≥101/min were significantly higher than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (HR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.51–5.88, HR = 3.65, 95% CI: 1.59–8.36, respectively). Conclusion: The resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session was associated with all-cause mortality after dialysis initiation.

AB - Aim: Some observational studies of the general population showed that resting heart rate was associated with mortality. However, the relationship was unclear in dialysis patients. Methods: The study was a multicentre prospective cohort analysis including 1102 patients. Patients were classified into four groups based on resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session: <60/min; 60–79/min; 80–100/min; and ≥101/min. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) related mortality, and incidences of CV events after dialysis initiation were compared using the log-rank test. All-cause mortality rates for patients with heart rates <60, 60–79, and ≥101/min were compared to those for patients with heart rates 80–100/min, using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Moreover, we compared the outcomes among patients without use of β-blocker or heart failure symptom at the first dialysis session. Results: Significant differences were observed in the all-cause mortality rates among the four groups (P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis revealed that all-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with heart rate ≥ 101/min than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25–4.23). Subgroup analysis showed that among patients without use of b-blocker or heart failure symptom, all-cause mortality rates for those with heart rates ≥101/min were significantly higher than in patients with heart rate 80–100/min (HR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.51–5.88, HR = 3.65, 95% CI: 1.59–8.36, respectively). Conclusion: The resting heart rate just before starting the first dialysis session was associated with all-cause mortality after dialysis initiation.

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U2 - 10.1111/nep.13048

DO - 10.1111/nep.13048

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 461

EP - 468

JO - Nephrology

JF - Nephrology

SN - 1320-5358

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ER -