Association of onset-season with characteristics and long-term outcomes in acute myocardial infarction patients: results from the Japanese registry of acute myocardial infarction diagnosed by universal definition (J-MINUET) substudy

J-MINUET investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is known that incidence and short-term mortality rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) tend to be higher in the cold season. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of onset-season with patient characteristics and long-term prognosis of AMI. This was a prospective, multicenter, Japanese investigation of 3,283 patients with AMI who were hospitalized within 48 h of symptom onset between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into 3 seasonal groups according to admission date: cold season group (December–March), hot season group (June–September), and moderate season group (April, May, October, and November). We identified 1356 patients (41.3%) admitted during the cold season, 901 (27.4%) during the hot season, and 1026 (31.3%) during the moderate season. We investigated the seasonal effect on patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Baseline characteristics of each seasonal group were comparable, with the exception of age, Killip class, and conduction disturbances. The rates of higher Killip class and complete atrioventricular block were significantly higher in the cold season group. The 3-year cumulative survival free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE) rate was the lowest in the cold season (67.1%), showing a significant difference, followed by the moderate (70.0%) and hot seasons (72.9%) (p < 0.01). Initial severity and long-term prognoses were worse in patients admitted during the cold season. Our findings highlight the importance of optimal prevention and follow-up of AMI patients with cold season onset.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1899-1908
Number of pages10
JournalHeart and Vessels
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2019

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Registries
Myocardial Infarction
Atrioventricular Block
Survival
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{56a5cebea4aa4395a13c495b79cef327,
title = "Association of onset-season with characteristics and long-term outcomes in acute myocardial infarction patients: results from the Japanese registry of acute myocardial infarction diagnosed by universal definition (J-MINUET) substudy",
abstract = "It is known that incidence and short-term mortality rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) tend to be higher in the cold season. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of onset-season with patient characteristics and long-term prognosis of AMI. This was a prospective, multicenter, Japanese investigation of 3,283 patients with AMI who were hospitalized within 48 h of symptom onset between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into 3 seasonal groups according to admission date: cold season group (December–March), hot season group (June–September), and moderate season group (April, May, October, and November). We identified 1356 patients (41.3{\%}) admitted during the cold season, 901 (27.4{\%}) during the hot season, and 1026 (31.3{\%}) during the moderate season. We investigated the seasonal effect on patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Baseline characteristics of each seasonal group were comparable, with the exception of age, Killip class, and conduction disturbances. The rates of higher Killip class and complete atrioventricular block were significantly higher in the cold season group. The 3-year cumulative survival free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE) rate was the lowest in the cold season (67.1{\%}), showing a significant difference, followed by the moderate (70.0{\%}) and hot seasons (72.9{\%}) (p < 0.01). Initial severity and long-term prognoses were worse in patients admitted during the cold season. Our findings highlight the importance of optimal prevention and follow-up of AMI patients with cold season onset.",
author = "{J-MINUET investigators} and Taishi Okuno and Jiro Aoki and Kengo Tanabe and Koichi Nakao and Yukio Ozaki and Kazuo Kimura and Junya Ako and Teruo Noguchi and Satoshi Yasuda and Satoru Suwa and Kazuteru Fujimoto and Yasuharu Nakama and Takashi Morita and Wataru Shimizu and Yoshihiko Saito and Atsushi Hirohata and Yasuhiro Morita and Teruo Inoue and Atsunori Okamura and Toshiaki Mano and Kazuhito Hirata and Yoshisato Shibata and Mafumi Owa and Kenichi Tsujita and Hiroshi Funayama and Nobuaki Kokubu and Ken Kozuma and Shiro Uemura and Tetsuya Tobaru and Keijiro Saku and Shigeru Ohshima and Kunihiro Nishimura and Yoshihiro Miyamoto and Hisao Ogawa and Masaharu Ishihara",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00380-019-01426-w",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1899--1908",
journal = "Heart and Vessels",
issn = "0910-8327",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of onset-season with characteristics and long-term outcomes in acute myocardial infarction patients

T2 - results from the Japanese registry of acute myocardial infarction diagnosed by universal definition (J-MINUET) substudy

AU - J-MINUET investigators

AU - Okuno, Taishi

AU - Aoki, Jiro

AU - Tanabe, Kengo

AU - Nakao, Koichi

AU - Ozaki, Yukio

AU - Kimura, Kazuo

AU - Ako, Junya

AU - Noguchi, Teruo

AU - Yasuda, Satoshi

AU - Suwa, Satoru

AU - Fujimoto, Kazuteru

AU - Nakama, Yasuharu

AU - Morita, Takashi

AU - Shimizu, Wataru

AU - Saito, Yoshihiko

AU - Hirohata, Atsushi

AU - Morita, Yasuhiro

AU - Inoue, Teruo

AU - Okamura, Atsunori

AU - Mano, Toshiaki

AU - Hirata, Kazuhito

AU - Shibata, Yoshisato

AU - Owa, Mafumi

AU - Tsujita, Kenichi

AU - Funayama, Hiroshi

AU - Kokubu, Nobuaki

AU - Kozuma, Ken

AU - Uemura, Shiro

AU - Tobaru, Tetsuya

AU - Saku, Keijiro

AU - Ohshima, Shigeru

AU - Nishimura, Kunihiro

AU - Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

AU - Ogawa, Hisao

AU - Ishihara, Masaharu

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - It is known that incidence and short-term mortality rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) tend to be higher in the cold season. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of onset-season with patient characteristics and long-term prognosis of AMI. This was a prospective, multicenter, Japanese investigation of 3,283 patients with AMI who were hospitalized within 48 h of symptom onset between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into 3 seasonal groups according to admission date: cold season group (December–March), hot season group (June–September), and moderate season group (April, May, October, and November). We identified 1356 patients (41.3%) admitted during the cold season, 901 (27.4%) during the hot season, and 1026 (31.3%) during the moderate season. We investigated the seasonal effect on patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Baseline characteristics of each seasonal group were comparable, with the exception of age, Killip class, and conduction disturbances. The rates of higher Killip class and complete atrioventricular block were significantly higher in the cold season group. The 3-year cumulative survival free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE) rate was the lowest in the cold season (67.1%), showing a significant difference, followed by the moderate (70.0%) and hot seasons (72.9%) (p < 0.01). Initial severity and long-term prognoses were worse in patients admitted during the cold season. Our findings highlight the importance of optimal prevention and follow-up of AMI patients with cold season onset.

AB - It is known that incidence and short-term mortality rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) tend to be higher in the cold season. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of onset-season with patient characteristics and long-term prognosis of AMI. This was a prospective, multicenter, Japanese investigation of 3,283 patients with AMI who were hospitalized within 48 h of symptom onset between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into 3 seasonal groups according to admission date: cold season group (December–March), hot season group (June–September), and moderate season group (April, May, October, and November). We identified 1356 patients (41.3%) admitted during the cold season, 901 (27.4%) during the hot season, and 1026 (31.3%) during the moderate season. We investigated the seasonal effect on patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Baseline characteristics of each seasonal group were comparable, with the exception of age, Killip class, and conduction disturbances. The rates of higher Killip class and complete atrioventricular block were significantly higher in the cold season group. The 3-year cumulative survival free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE) rate was the lowest in the cold season (67.1%), showing a significant difference, followed by the moderate (70.0%) and hot seasons (72.9%) (p < 0.01). Initial severity and long-term prognoses were worse in patients admitted during the cold season. Our findings highlight the importance of optimal prevention and follow-up of AMI patients with cold season onset.

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U2 - 10.1007/s00380-019-01426-w

DO - 10.1007/s00380-019-01426-w

M3 - Article

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AN - SCOPUS:85071341139

VL - 34

SP - 1899

EP - 1908

JO - Heart and Vessels

JF - Heart and Vessels

SN - 0910-8327

IS - 12

ER -