Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan

Koji Wada, Toshihiko Satoh, Masashi Tsunoda, Yoshiharu Aizawa, Norito Kawakami, Takashi Haratani, Fumio Kobayashi, Masao Ishizaki, Takeshi Hayashi, Osamu Fujita, Takeshi Masumoto, Shogo Miyazaki, Hisanori Hiro, Shuji Hashimoto, Shunichi Araki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The associations between health behaviors and depressive symptoms have been demonstrated in many studies. However, job strain has also been associated with health behaviors. The aim of this study was to analyze whether health behaviors such as physical activity, sleeping, smoking and alcohol intake are associated with depressive symptoms after adjusting for job strain. Workers were recruited from nine companies and factories located in east and central areas of Japan. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Psychological demand and control (decision-latitude) at work were measured with the Job Content Questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent contribution of each health behavior to depressive symptoms. Among the total participants, 3,748 (22.7%) had depressive symptoms, which was defined as scoring 16 or higher on the CES-D scale. Using the multiple logistic regression analysis, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with physical activity less than once a week (adjusted relative risk [ARR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 1.25) and daily hours of sleep of 6 h or less (ARR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.35). Smoking and frequency of alcohol intake were not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. This study suggests some health behaviors such as physical activity or daily hours of sleep are associated with depressive symptoms after adjusting for job strain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)486-492
Number of pages7
JournalIndustrial Health
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-07-2006

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Japan
Depression
Exercise
Epidemiologic Studies
Sleep
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Wada, K., Satoh, T., Tsunoda, M., Aizawa, Y., Kawakami, N., Haratani, T., ... Araki, S. (2006). Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan. Industrial Health, 44(3), 486-492. https://doi.org/10.2486/indhealth.44.486
Wada, Koji ; Satoh, Toshihiko ; Tsunoda, Masashi ; Aizawa, Yoshiharu ; Kawakami, Norito ; Haratani, Takashi ; Kobayashi, Fumio ; Ishizaki, Masao ; Hayashi, Takeshi ; Fujita, Osamu ; Masumoto, Takeshi ; Miyazaki, Shogo ; Hiro, Hisanori ; Hashimoto, Shuji ; Araki, Shunichi. / Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan. In: Industrial Health. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 486-492.
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Wada, K, Satoh, T, Tsunoda, M, Aizawa, Y, Kawakami, N, Haratani, T, Kobayashi, F, Ishizaki, M, Hayashi, T, Fujita, O, Masumoto, T, Miyazaki, S, Hiro, H, Hashimoto, S & Araki, S 2006, 'Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan', Industrial Health, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 486-492. https://doi.org/10.2486/indhealth.44.486

Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan. / Wada, Koji; Satoh, Toshihiko; Tsunoda, Masashi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Kawakami, Norito; Haratani, Takashi; Kobayashi, Fumio; Ishizaki, Masao; Hayashi, Takeshi; Fujita, Osamu; Masumoto, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Hiro, Hisanori; Hashimoto, Shuji; Araki, Shunichi.

In: Industrial Health, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.07.2006, p. 486-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Wada, Koji

AU - Satoh, Toshihiko

AU - Tsunoda, Masashi

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AU - Kawakami, Norito

AU - Haratani, Takashi

AU - Kobayashi, Fumio

AU - Ishizaki, Masao

AU - Hayashi, Takeshi

AU - Fujita, Osamu

AU - Masumoto, Takeshi

AU - Miyazaki, Shogo

AU - Hiro, Hisanori

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

AU - Araki, Shunichi

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Wada K, Satoh T, Tsunoda M, Aizawa Y, Kawakami N, Haratani T et al. Associations of health behaviors on depressive symptoms among employed men in Japan. Industrial Health. 2006 Jul 1;44(3):486-492. https://doi.org/10.2486/indhealth.44.486