Azapirones for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

A Systematic Review

Y. Matsui, S. Matsunaga, Y. Matsuda, T. Kishi, Nakao Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: No meta-analysis has evaluated azapirones (serotonin 1A receptor partial agonists) as anxiolytics for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and single-arm trials published before October 27, 2015 were retrieved from major healthcare databases and clinical trial registries. Relative risk and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: 5 RCTs (n=429) and 3 single-arm studies (n=70) were identified. 3 RCTs compared buspirone vs. methylphenidate in children/adolescents, one buspirone patches vs. placebo patches in children/adolescents, and one atomoxetine plus buspirone vs. atomoxetine vs. placebo in adults. The single-arm studies were buspirone trails in children/adolescents. All-cause discontinuation rates and adverse events did not differ between pooled buspirone and methylphenidate groups. No other meta-analyses of buspirone efficacy and safety vs. comparators were conducted due to insufficient data. 2 RCTs found no significant differences in parent and teacher ADHD-Rating Scale total scores between buspirone and methylphenidate, while one reported that methylphenidate improved parent and teacher ADHD-RS total scores vs. buspirone. Discussion: It remains unclear whether buspirone use has benefit for ADHD patients and therefore further evidence is needed for better clinical use of buspirone in patients with ADHD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-106
Number of pages10
JournalPharmacopsychiatry
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2016

Fingerprint

Buspirone
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Methylphenidate
Randomized Controlled Trials
Meta-Analysis
Placebos
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1A
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Registries
Clinical Trials
Databases
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Matsui, Y. ; Matsunaga, S. ; Matsuda, Y. ; Kishi, T. ; Iwata, Nakao. / Azapirones for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder : A Systematic Review. In: Pharmacopsychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 97-106.
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Azapirones for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder : A Systematic Review. / Matsui, Y.; Matsunaga, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Kishi, T.; Iwata, Nakao.

In: Pharmacopsychiatry, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.05.2016, p. 97-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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