Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Two of the four betaherpesviruses, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B), play an important role in opportunistic infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. These viruses are ubiquitous in humans and can latently infect mononuclear lymphocytes, complicating the diagnosis of the diseases they cause. Although the detection of viral DNA in a patient’s peripheral blood by real-time PCR is widely used for monitoring viral infection, it is insufficient for the diagnosis of virus-associated disease. Theoretically, end-organ disease should be confirmed by detecting either viral antigen or significant amounts of viral DNA in a tissue sample obtained from the involved organ; however, this is often difficult to perform in clinical practice. The frequency of CMV-associated diseases has decreased gradually as a result of the introduction of preemptive or prophylactic treatments; however, CMV and HHV-6B infections remain a major problem in HSCT recipients. Measurement of viral DNA load in peripheral blood or plasma using real-time PCR is commonly used for monitoring these infections. Additionally, recent data suggest that an assessment of host immune response, particularly cytotoxic T-cell response, may be a reliable tool for predicting these viral infections. The antiviral drugs ganciclovir and foscarnet are used as first-line treatments; however, it is well known that these drugs have side effects, such as bone marrow suppression and nephrotoxicity. Further research is required to develop less-toxic antiviral drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages251-270
Number of pages20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1045
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Viral DNA
Virus Diseases
Stem cells
Cytomegalovirus
Human Herpesvirus 6
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Transplants
Antiviral Agents
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Viruses
Foscarnet
Herpesviridae Infections
Ganciclovir
Blood
Viral Antigens
Poisons
Opportunistic Infections
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Viral Load

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Yoshikawa, T. (2018). Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 251-270). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1045). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-7230-7_12
Yoshikawa, Tetsushi. / Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. pp. 251-270 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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Yoshikawa, T 2018, Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1045, Springer New York LLC, pp. 251-270. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-7230-7_12

Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. / Yoshikawa, Tetsushi.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. p. 251-270 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1045).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Yoshikawa T. Betaherpesvirus complications and management during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2018. p. 251-270. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-7230-7_12