Body mass index and risks of incident ischemic stroke subtypes: The Japan public health center-based prospective (JPHC) study

Yuanying Li, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Hiroyasu Iso, Kazumasa Yamagishi, Isao Saito, Yoshihiro Kokubo, Norie Sawada, Shoichiro Tsugane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The association of body mass index (BMI) with risks of ischemic stroke subtypes have not been established. Methods: Cumulative average BMI was calculated using self-reported body weight and height obtained from baseline (Cohort I in 1990, and Cohort II from 1993-1994) and 5- and 10-year questionnaire surveys of Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study. A total of 42,343 men and 46,413 women aged 40-69 years were followed-up for the incidence of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes. A sub-distribution hazard model was used to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During a median of 20.0 years of follow-up, we documented 809 and 481 lacunar, 395 and 218 large-artery occlusive, and 568 and 298 cardioembolic strokes in men and women, respectively. After adjustment for baseline age, updated smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, and histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, cumulative average BMI was positively linearly associated with lacunar (trend P = 0.007), large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.002), and cardioembolic (trend P < 0.001) strokes in men, and with lacunar (trend P < 0.001) and large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.003) strokes in women. There were approximately two-fold excess risk of cardioembolic stroke in both sexes and of lacunar and large-artery occlusive strokes in women for cumulative average BMI ≥30 kg=m2 compared to BMI 23-<25 kg=m2. Conclusion: Cumulative average BMI showed a positive linear effect on sub-distribution hazards of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes in both sexes, except for cardioembolic stroke in women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-333
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of epidemiology
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2019

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Japan
Body Mass Index
Public Health
Stroke
Prospective Studies
Arteries
Body Height
Leisure Activities
Dyslipidemias
Proportional Hazards Models
Alcohol Drinking
Diabetes Mellitus
Smoking
Body Weight
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Hypertension
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Li, Yuanying ; Yatsuya, Hiroshi ; Iso, Hiroyasu ; Yamagishi, Kazumasa ; Saito, Isao ; Kokubo, Yoshihiro ; Sawada, Norie ; Tsugane, Shoichiro. / Body mass index and risks of incident ischemic stroke subtypes : The Japan public health center-based prospective (JPHC) study. In: Journal of epidemiology. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 9. pp. 325-333.
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abstract = "Background: The association of body mass index (BMI) with risks of ischemic stroke subtypes have not been established. Methods: Cumulative average BMI was calculated using self-reported body weight and height obtained from baseline (Cohort I in 1990, and Cohort II from 1993-1994) and 5- and 10-year questionnaire surveys of Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study. A total of 42,343 men and 46,413 women aged 40-69 years were followed-up for the incidence of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes. A sub-distribution hazard model was used to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs) and the 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During a median of 20.0 years of follow-up, we documented 809 and 481 lacunar, 395 and 218 large-artery occlusive, and 568 and 298 cardioembolic strokes in men and women, respectively. After adjustment for baseline age, updated smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, and histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, cumulative average BMI was positively linearly associated with lacunar (trend P = 0.007), large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.002), and cardioembolic (trend P < 0.001) strokes in men, and with lacunar (trend P < 0.001) and large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.003) strokes in women. There were approximately two-fold excess risk of cardioembolic stroke in both sexes and of lacunar and large-artery occlusive strokes in women for cumulative average BMI ≥30 kg=m2 compared to BMI 23-<25 kg=m2. Conclusion: Cumulative average BMI showed a positive linear effect on sub-distribution hazards of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes in both sexes, except for cardioembolic stroke in women.",
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Body mass index and risks of incident ischemic stroke subtypes : The Japan public health center-based prospective (JPHC) study. / Li, Yuanying; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Saito, Isao; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro.

In: Journal of epidemiology, Vol. 29, No. 9, 01.01.2019, p. 325-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Body mass index and risks of incident ischemic stroke subtypes

T2 - The Japan public health center-based prospective (JPHC) study

AU - Li, Yuanying

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Yamagishi, Kazumasa

AU - Saito, Isao

AU - Kokubo, Yoshihiro

AU - Sawada, Norie

AU - Tsugane, Shoichiro

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: The association of body mass index (BMI) with risks of ischemic stroke subtypes have not been established. Methods: Cumulative average BMI was calculated using self-reported body weight and height obtained from baseline (Cohort I in 1990, and Cohort II from 1993-1994) and 5- and 10-year questionnaire surveys of Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study. A total of 42,343 men and 46,413 women aged 40-69 years were followed-up for the incidence of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes. A sub-distribution hazard model was used to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During a median of 20.0 years of follow-up, we documented 809 and 481 lacunar, 395 and 218 large-artery occlusive, and 568 and 298 cardioembolic strokes in men and women, respectively. After adjustment for baseline age, updated smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, and histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, cumulative average BMI was positively linearly associated with lacunar (trend P = 0.007), large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.002), and cardioembolic (trend P < 0.001) strokes in men, and with lacunar (trend P < 0.001) and large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.003) strokes in women. There were approximately two-fold excess risk of cardioembolic stroke in both sexes and of lacunar and large-artery occlusive strokes in women for cumulative average BMI ≥30 kg=m2 compared to BMI 23-<25 kg=m2. Conclusion: Cumulative average BMI showed a positive linear effect on sub-distribution hazards of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes in both sexes, except for cardioembolic stroke in women.

AB - Background: The association of body mass index (BMI) with risks of ischemic stroke subtypes have not been established. Methods: Cumulative average BMI was calculated using self-reported body weight and height obtained from baseline (Cohort I in 1990, and Cohort II from 1993-1994) and 5- and 10-year questionnaire surveys of Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study. A total of 42,343 men and 46,413 women aged 40-69 years were followed-up for the incidence of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes. A sub-distribution hazard model was used to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During a median of 20.0 years of follow-up, we documented 809 and 481 lacunar, 395 and 218 large-artery occlusive, and 568 and 298 cardioembolic strokes in men and women, respectively. After adjustment for baseline age, updated smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, and histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, cumulative average BMI was positively linearly associated with lacunar (trend P = 0.007), large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.002), and cardioembolic (trend P < 0.001) strokes in men, and with lacunar (trend P < 0.001) and large-artery occlusive (trend P = 0.003) strokes in women. There were approximately two-fold excess risk of cardioembolic stroke in both sexes and of lacunar and large-artery occlusive strokes in women for cumulative average BMI ≥30 kg=m2 compared to BMI 23-<25 kg=m2. Conclusion: Cumulative average BMI showed a positive linear effect on sub-distribution hazards of lacunar, large-artery occlusive, and cardioembolic strokes in both sexes, except for cardioembolic stroke in women.

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