Cardiac counterclockwise rotation is a risk factor for high-dose irradiation to the left anterior descending coronary artery in patients with left-sided breast cancer who receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

Hidekazu Tanaka, Shinya Hayashi, Hiroaki Hoshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients irradiated for left-sided breast cancer have higher incidence of cardiovascular disease than those receiving irradiation for right-sided breast cancer. Most abnormalities were in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery territory. We analyzed the relationships between preoperative examination results and irradiation dose to the LAD artery in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Seventy-one patients receiving breast radiotherapy were analyzed. The heart may rotate around longitudinal axis, showing either clockwise or counterclockwise rotation (CCWR). On electrocardiography, the transition zone (TZ) was judged in precordial leads. CCWR was considered to be present if TZ was at or to the right of V3. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The maximum (Dmax) and mean (Dmean) doses to the LAD artery and the volumes of the LAD artery receiving at least 20 Gy, 30 Gy and 40 Gy (V20Gy, V30Gy and V40Gy, respectively) were significantly higher in CCWR than in the non-CCWR patients. On multivariate analysis, TZ was significantly associated with Dmax, Dmean, V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy. CCWR is a risk factor for high-dose irradiation to the LAD artery. Electrocardiography is useful for evaluating the cardiovascular risk of high-dose irradiation to the LAD artery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalNagoya journal of medical science
Volume76
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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