Caveolae: From a morphological point of view

Toyoshi Fujimoto, Haruo Hagiwara, Takeo Aoki, Hiroshi Kogo, Ryuji Nomura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caveolae in the plasma membrane have been a focus of intensive research during the past several years. There has been confusion concerning caveolae and caveola-like membrane domains, but it is now generally thought that the latter is a region distinct from caveolae. However, due to similar buoyancy of caveolae and caveola-like membranes, whether caveolae in situ are enriched with a given molecule is often difficult to be concluded by biochemical techniques alone. Furthermore, relatively shallow caveolae may be detected by some techniques, but not by others. Thus whether a molecule is enriched in caveolae should be confirmed by methods based on different principles. Among many putative caveolar molecules, those related to Ca2+ influx and extrusion were shown to be concentrated in caveolae by both immunocytochemical and biochemical techniques. In conjunction with other characteristics, the result implies that caveolae may function as a mobile compartment for Ca2+ signalling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-460
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Electron Microscopy
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1998

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Caveolae
membranes
Molecules
Membranes
molecules
confusion
compartments
Cell membranes
Buoyancy
buoyancy
Extrusion
Cell Membrane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Fujimoto, Toyoshi ; Hagiwara, Haruo ; Aoki, Takeo ; Kogo, Hiroshi ; Nomura, Ryuji. / Caveolae : From a morphological point of view. In: Journal of Electron Microscopy. 1998 ; Vol. 47, No. 5. pp. 451-460.
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Caveolae : From a morphological point of view. / Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Hagiwara, Haruo; Aoki, Takeo; Kogo, Hiroshi; Nomura, Ryuji.

In: Journal of Electron Microscopy, Vol. 47, No. 5, 01.01.1998, p. 451-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Fujimoto, Toyoshi

AU - Hagiwara, Haruo

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AU - Kogo, Hiroshi

AU - Nomura, Ryuji

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