Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats

Tsukasa Tsuchimochi, Mineo Iwasa, Yoshitaka Maeno, Hiroyoshi Koyama, Hiroyuki Inoue, Ichiro Isobe, Ryoji Matoba, Motoo Yokoi, Masataka Nagao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100°C, 200°C, 300°C, 400°C, and 500°C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300°C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300°C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-271
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 09-2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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