Clinical appraisal of fosfomycin in the era of antimicrobial resistance

Sangeeta Sastry, Lloyd G. Clarke, Hind Alrowais, Ashley M. Querry, Kathleen A. Shutt, Yohei Doi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fosfomycin is recommended as one of the first-line agents for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the latest guidelines endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID). We evaluated the use of fosfomycin among inpatients at a tertiary care hospital between 2009 and 2013. UTI cases were defined using physician diagnosis and the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definitions. The number of patients treated with fosfomycin increased from none in 2009 to 391 in 2013. Among 537 patients who received fosfomycin for any indication during this period, UTI was the most common indication (74%), followed by asymptomatic bacteriuria (10%). All except 19 patients received a single dose of fosfomycin. Escherichia coli was the most common organism involved (52%). For 119 patients with UTIs, after exclusion of those with negative urine culture results, negative urinalysis results, receipt of additional agents, or indeterminate clinical outcomes, the clinical success rate at 48 h was 74.8%. Of 89 patients who met the criteria for NHSN-defined UTIs, 89.9% had successful outcomes. Recurrent infections occurred in 4.3% of cases, and mild adverse events were observed in 2.0%. All 100 randomly selected extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli clinical isolates from this period were susceptible to fosfomycin. In conclusion, the use of fosfomycin has increased substantially since implementation of the updated guidelines at this hospital. Fosfomycin was used mainly for the treatment of physician- diagnosed UTIs, and the clinical outcomes were generally favorable. Fosfomycin maintained activity against E. coli despite the increased use of the agent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7355-7361
Number of pages7
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume59
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2015

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Fosfomycin
Urinary Tract Infections
Escherichia coli
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Safety
Bacteriuria
Urinalysis
Tertiary Healthcare
Microbiology
Tertiary Care Centers
Communicable Diseases
Inpatients
Urine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Sastry, Sangeeta ; Clarke, Lloyd G. ; Alrowais, Hind ; Querry, Ashley M. ; Shutt, Kathleen A. ; Doi, Yohei. / Clinical appraisal of fosfomycin in the era of antimicrobial resistance. In: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy. 2015 ; Vol. 59, No. 12. pp. 7355-7361.
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Sastry, S, Clarke, LG, Alrowais, H, Querry, AM, Shutt, KA & Doi, Y 2015, 'Clinical appraisal of fosfomycin in the era of antimicrobial resistance', Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, vol. 59, no. 12, pp. 7355-7361. https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01071-15

Clinical appraisal of fosfomycin in the era of antimicrobial resistance. / Sastry, Sangeeta; Clarke, Lloyd G.; Alrowais, Hind; Querry, Ashley M.; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Doi, Yohei.

In: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, Vol. 59, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. 7355-7361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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