Clinical impact of non-lying time on hospital-associated functional decline in older patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

Yuji Kono, Masahiko Mukaino, Yushi Ozawa, Koji Mizutani, Yuki Senju, Takayuki Ogasawara, Masumi Yamaguchi, Takashi Muramatsu, Hideo Izawa, Yohei Otaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purposes of the present study were: (1) to investigate the relationship between hospital-associated functional decline (HAFD) and non-lying time and (2) to clarify the optimal cut-off value for non-lying time associated with HAFD in older patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). From January 2021 to December 2022, patients admitted to a university hospital who underwent trans-femoral TAVI were consecutively recruited. We measured short physical performance battery (SPPB) pre and post-TAVI, and non-lying time from post-operative days 3–5. HAFD was defined as at least 1 point decrease in SPPB during pre and post-TAVI. Among 75 patients (47 female, mean age of 84.5 years) enrolled, 14 patients were classified as having HAFD. Non-lying time was significantly shorter in the HAFD group than in the non-HAFD group (371 min vs. 539 min, P < 0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined an optimal cut-off value of 477 min for differentiating the patients more likely to experience HAFD (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 92%; area under the curve, 0.798). The non-lying time could be one of the associated factors of HAFD in older patients with TAVI. Non-lying time of about 480 min (8 h) during hospitalization may be an initial target for preventing HAFD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-272
Number of pages7
JournalHeart and Vessels
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03-2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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