Clinical significance of centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction in patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: A retrospective case-control study

Masami Shimoda, Shinri Oda, Hideaki Shigematsu, Kaori Hoshikawa, Masaaki Imai, Fuminari Komatsu, Akihiro Hirayama, Takahiro Osada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We previously reported centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction at the time of thunderclap headache remission in patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Here we examine the clinical significance of centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction. Methods: Participants comprised 48 patients who underwent magnetic resonance angiography within 72 h of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome onset and within 48 h of thunderclap headache remission. Results: In 24 of the 48 patients (50%), centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction occurred on magnetic resonance angiography at the time of thunderclap headache remission. The interval from first to last thunderclap headache in patients with centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction (14 ± 10 days) was significantly longer than that of patients without centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction (4 ± 2 days). In the patients with centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction at the time of thunderclap headache remission, the incidence of another cerebral lesion (38%, 9 of 24 cases) was significantly higher than in patients without centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction (0%). From findings of sequential magnetic resonance angiography before and after thunderclap headache remission, we observed tendencies in which centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction gradually progressed after the onset of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and peaked at the time of thunderclap headache remission. The progress of centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction concluded with thunderclap headache remission. Conclusions: Centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction has clinical significance as an indicator of the severity of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. The presence of centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction is associated with an increased risk of brain lesions and a longer interval from first to last thunderclap headache. Moreover, repeat magnetic resonance angiography to assess centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction during the time from onset to thunderclap headache remission can help diagnose reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1864-1875
Number of pages12
JournalCephalalgia
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

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