Clinical use of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for functional electrical stimulation

Yoichi Shimada, Kozo Sato, Hitoshi Kagaya, Natsuo Konishi, Seiya Miyamoto, Toshiki Matsunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the clinical use of the percutaneous intramuscular electrode in functional electrical stimulation (FES). Design: Randomized and controlled study. Setting: A referral center and institutional practice providing outpatients (12 men, 5 women) who had implanted percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for more than 1 year examined. The average follow-up time after implantation of electrodes was 2.2 years (range, 1yr to 4yr 10mo). Overall, there were 327 electrodes (83 upper extremities and 244 lower extremities). Intervention: The indwelling electrode was composed of helically coiled Teflon-coated rope stranded from 19 hard drawn wires of SUS 316L stainless steel (SES 114). Main Outcome Measures: The rates of breakage, movement, and infection, and the number of electrodes that needed reimplantation were evaluated. Results. Only one electrode broke (0.3%) in the iliopsoas muscle at 12 weeks after implantation. Eight electrodes (2.4%) were removed because of loss of sufficient contraction force caused by movement of the electrodes. Movements occurred at 9 weeks in 6 electrodes and at 5 months in two. The failure rate of electrodes in the lower extremities was 3.7%. No failures occurred in the upper extremities. Ten electrodes (3.1%) required reimplantation. Although ten superficial infections (3.1%) were seen around the site of electrode insertion, no removals of electrode were needed. All electrodes in one patient were removed, however, because of generalized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection complicated with renal disease. Electrodes were reimplanted after improvement of the infection. Conclusions: The ultrafine percutaneous intramuscular electrode was considered practical for long-term FES use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1014-1018
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume77
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1996

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Electric Stimulation
Electrodes
Replantation
Infection
Upper Extremity
Lower Extremity
Institutional Practice
Stainless Steel
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Outpatients
Referral and Consultation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Shimada, Yoichi ; Sato, Kozo ; Kagaya, Hitoshi ; Konishi, Natsuo ; Miyamoto, Seiya ; Matsunaga, Toshiki. / Clinical use of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for functional electrical stimulation. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1996 ; Vol. 77, No. 10. pp. 1014-1018.
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Clinical use of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for functional electrical stimulation. / Shimada, Yoichi; Sato, Kozo; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Konishi, Natsuo; Miyamoto, Seiya; Matsunaga, Toshiki.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 77, No. 10, 01.01.1996, p. 1014-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Shimada, Yoichi

AU - Sato, Kozo

AU - Kagaya, Hitoshi

AU - Konishi, Natsuo

AU - Miyamoto, Seiya

AU - Matsunaga, Toshiki

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the clinical use of the percutaneous intramuscular electrode in functional electrical stimulation (FES). Design: Randomized and controlled study. Setting: A referral center and institutional practice providing outpatients (12 men, 5 women) who had implanted percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for more than 1 year examined. The average follow-up time after implantation of electrodes was 2.2 years (range, 1yr to 4yr 10mo). Overall, there were 327 electrodes (83 upper extremities and 244 lower extremities). Intervention: The indwelling electrode was composed of helically coiled Teflon-coated rope stranded from 19 hard drawn wires of SUS 316L stainless steel (SES 114). Main Outcome Measures: The rates of breakage, movement, and infection, and the number of electrodes that needed reimplantation were evaluated. Results. Only one electrode broke (0.3%) in the iliopsoas muscle at 12 weeks after implantation. Eight electrodes (2.4%) were removed because of loss of sufficient contraction force caused by movement of the electrodes. Movements occurred at 9 weeks in 6 electrodes and at 5 months in two. The failure rate of electrodes in the lower extremities was 3.7%. No failures occurred in the upper extremities. Ten electrodes (3.1%) required reimplantation. Although ten superficial infections (3.1%) were seen around the site of electrode insertion, no removals of electrode were needed. All electrodes in one patient were removed, however, because of generalized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection complicated with renal disease. Electrodes were reimplanted after improvement of the infection. Conclusions: The ultrafine percutaneous intramuscular electrode was considered practical for long-term FES use.

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