Coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer

A prospective cohort study in Japan

Toru Naganuma, Shinichi Kuriyama, Munira Akhter, Masako Kakizaki, Naoki Nakaya, Kaori Matsuda-Ohmori, Taichi Shimazu, Akira Fukao, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer has been reported in several case-control studies, but results from prospective cohort studies have been inconclusive. We conducted a prospective cohort study among a Japanese population to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer incidence. We used data from the Miyagi Cohort Study for this analysis. Usable self-administered questionnaires about coffee consumption were returned from 22,836 men and 24,769 women, aged 40-64 years, with no previous history of cancer. We used the Cox proportional-hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. During 11.6 years of follow-up (425,303 person-years), we identified 457 cases of colorectal cancer. Coffee consumption was not associated with the incidence of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of colorectal cancer incidence for 3 or more cups of coffee per day as compared with no consumption was 0.95 (0.65-1.39) for men and women (p for trend = 0.55), 0.91 (0.56-1.46) for men (p for trend = 0.53) and 1.16 (0.60-2.23) for women (p for trend = 0.996). Coffee consumption was also not associated with incidence of either proximal or distal colon cancer. We conclude that coffee consumption is not associated with the incidence risk of colorectal cancer in the general population in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1542-1547
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume120
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2007

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Coffee
Colorectal Neoplasms
Japan
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Incidence
Colonic Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Rectal Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Population
Case-Control Studies
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Naganuma, T., Kuriyama, S., Akhter, M., Kakizaki, M., Nakaya, N., Matsuda-Ohmori, K., ... Tsuji, I. (2007). Coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer: A prospective cohort study in Japan. International Journal of Cancer, 120(7), 1542-1547. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22505
Naganuma, Toru ; Kuriyama, Shinichi ; Akhter, Munira ; Kakizaki, Masako ; Nakaya, Naoki ; Matsuda-Ohmori, Kaori ; Shimazu, Taichi ; Fukao, Akira ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / Coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer : A prospective cohort study in Japan. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2007 ; Vol. 120, No. 7. pp. 1542-1547.
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abstract = "An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer has been reported in several case-control studies, but results from prospective cohort studies have been inconclusive. We conducted a prospective cohort study among a Japanese population to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer incidence. We used data from the Miyagi Cohort Study for this analysis. Usable self-administered questionnaires about coffee consumption were returned from 22,836 men and 24,769 women, aged 40-64 years, with no previous history of cancer. We used the Cox proportional-hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals. During 11.6 years of follow-up (425,303 person-years), we identified 457 cases of colorectal cancer. Coffee consumption was not associated with the incidence of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95{\%} confidence interval) of colorectal cancer incidence for 3 or more cups of coffee per day as compared with no consumption was 0.95 (0.65-1.39) for men and women (p for trend = 0.55), 0.91 (0.56-1.46) for men (p for trend = 0.53) and 1.16 (0.60-2.23) for women (p for trend = 0.996). Coffee consumption was also not associated with incidence of either proximal or distal colon cancer. We conclude that coffee consumption is not associated with the incidence risk of colorectal cancer in the general population in Japan.",
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Naganuma, T, Kuriyama, S, Akhter, M, Kakizaki, M, Nakaya, N, Matsuda-Ohmori, K, Shimazu, T, Fukao, A & Tsuji, I 2007, 'Coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer: A prospective cohort study in Japan', International Journal of Cancer, vol. 120, no. 7, pp. 1542-1547. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22505

Coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer : A prospective cohort study in Japan. / Naganuma, Toru; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Akhter, Munira; Kakizaki, Masako; Nakaya, Naoki; Matsuda-Ohmori, Kaori; Shimazu, Taichi; Fukao, Akira; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 120, No. 7, 01.04.2007, p. 1542-1547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Fukao, Akira

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

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N2 - An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer has been reported in several case-control studies, but results from prospective cohort studies have been inconclusive. We conducted a prospective cohort study among a Japanese population to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer incidence. We used data from the Miyagi Cohort Study for this analysis. Usable self-administered questionnaires about coffee consumption were returned from 22,836 men and 24,769 women, aged 40-64 years, with no previous history of cancer. We used the Cox proportional-hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. During 11.6 years of follow-up (425,303 person-years), we identified 457 cases of colorectal cancer. Coffee consumption was not associated with the incidence of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of colorectal cancer incidence for 3 or more cups of coffee per day as compared with no consumption was 0.95 (0.65-1.39) for men and women (p for trend = 0.55), 0.91 (0.56-1.46) for men (p for trend = 0.53) and 1.16 (0.60-2.23) for women (p for trend = 0.996). Coffee consumption was also not associated with incidence of either proximal or distal colon cancer. We conclude that coffee consumption is not associated with the incidence risk of colorectal cancer in the general population in Japan.

AB - An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer has been reported in several case-control studies, but results from prospective cohort studies have been inconclusive. We conducted a prospective cohort study among a Japanese population to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer incidence. We used data from the Miyagi Cohort Study for this analysis. Usable self-administered questionnaires about coffee consumption were returned from 22,836 men and 24,769 women, aged 40-64 years, with no previous history of cancer. We used the Cox proportional-hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. During 11.6 years of follow-up (425,303 person-years), we identified 457 cases of colorectal cancer. Coffee consumption was not associated with the incidence of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of colorectal cancer incidence for 3 or more cups of coffee per day as compared with no consumption was 0.95 (0.65-1.39) for men and women (p for trend = 0.55), 0.91 (0.56-1.46) for men (p for trend = 0.53) and 1.16 (0.60-2.23) for women (p for trend = 0.996). Coffee consumption was also not associated with incidence of either proximal or distal colon cancer. We conclude that coffee consumption is not associated with the incidence risk of colorectal cancer in the general population in Japan.

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