Coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers in Japan

The Miyagi Cohort Study

Toru Naganuma, Shinichi Kuriyama, Masako Kakizaki, Toshimasa Sone, Naoki Nakaya, Kaori Ohmori-Matsuda, Yoshikazu Nishino, Akira Fukao, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers has been suggested in case-control studies, but few results from prospective studies are available. Data from the Miyagi Cohort Study in Japan were used to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of these cancers. Information about coffee consumption was obtained from self-administered food frequency questionnaires in 1990. Among 38,679 subjects aged 40-64 years with no previous history of cancer, 157 cases of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers were identified during 13.6 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers was inversely associated with coffee consumption. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of these cancers for ≥1 cups of coffee per day compared with no consumption was 0.51 (95% confidence interval: 0.33, 0.77). This inverse association was consistent regardless of sex and cancer site and was observed both for subjects who did not drink or smoke and for those who currently drank or smoked at baseline. In conclusion, coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers, even in the group at high risk of these cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1425-1432
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume168
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2008

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Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Mouth Neoplasms
Coffee
Esophageal Neoplasms
Japan
Cohort Studies
Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Smoke
Case-Control Studies
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Naganuma, Toru ; Kuriyama, Shinichi ; Kakizaki, Masako ; Sone, Toshimasa ; Nakaya, Naoki ; Ohmori-Matsuda, Kaori ; Nishino, Yoshikazu ; Fukao, Akira ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / Coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers in Japan : The Miyagi Cohort Study. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2008 ; Vol. 168, No. 12. pp. 1425-1432.
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Naganuma, T, Kuriyama, S, Kakizaki, M, Sone, T, Nakaya, N, Ohmori-Matsuda, K, Nishino, Y, Fukao, A & Tsuji, I 2008, 'Coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers in Japan: The Miyagi Cohort Study', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 168, no. 12, pp. 1425-1432. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn282

Coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers in Japan : The Miyagi Cohort Study. / Naganuma, Toru; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Kakizaki, Masako; Sone, Toshimasa; Nakaya, Naoki; Ohmori-Matsuda, Kaori; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Fukao, Akira; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 168, No. 12, 01.12.2008, p. 1425-1432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers has been suggested in case-control studies, but few results from prospective studies are available. Data from the Miyagi Cohort Study in Japan were used to clarify the association between coffee consumption and the risk of these cancers. Information about coffee consumption was obtained from self-administered food frequency questionnaires in 1990. Among 38,679 subjects aged 40-64 years with no previous history of cancer, 157 cases of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers were identified during 13.6 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers was inversely associated with coffee consumption. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of these cancers for ≥1 cups of coffee per day compared with no consumption was 0.51 (95% confidence interval: 0.33, 0.77). This inverse association was consistent regardless of sex and cancer site and was observed both for subjects who did not drink or smoke and for those who currently drank or smoked at baseline. In conclusion, coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal cancers, even in the group at high risk of these cancers.

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