Comparative benefits of laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians: a case-matched comparison of short- and long-term outcomes with middle-aged patients

Koki Otsuka, Toshimoto Kimura, Masanori Hakozaki, Mizunori Yaegashi, Teppei Matsuo, Hitoshi Fujii, Kei Sato, Tomoki Hatanaka, Akira Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative short- and long-term outcomes after laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) between octogenarians and healthy middle-aged patients. Methods: Between January 1997 and July 2009, 655 consecutive laparoscopic surgeries for colorectal cancer patients were operated by 1 colorectal surgeon. Ninety-three patients were octogenarians (≥80 years), and 133 patients were case-matched middle-aged (60–69 years) patients. We analyzed the mean operative time, blood loss, type of surgery for rectal cancer, length of hospital stay, mortality, and morbidity. The overall survival curve was constructed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The American Society of Anesthesiologists classification was significantly higher in the octogenarians than in the middle-aged controls. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the incidence of morbidities (11.7 vs. 9.2 %) and length of hospital stay (12.1 vs. 10.9 days). The number of lymph nodes harvested was significantly fewer (p < 0.05) and the operative time significantly shorter (p < 0.05) in the octogenarians than in the middle-aged controls. At a mean follow-up of 38.2 months, the overall 5-year survival rate was 64.8 % in the octogenarians and 92.4 % in the middle-aged group, whereas the cancer-specific 5-year survival rate was 91 % in the octogenarians and 95.7 % in the middle-aged group. Conclusions: We suggest that advanced age should not be a contraindication for LCS, even for complex procedures, such as laparoscopic rectal resection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-594
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery Today
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2017
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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