Comparative study of acute effects of single doses of fexofenadine, olopatadine, d-chlorpheniramine and placebo on psychomotor function in healthy volunteers

Hiroyuki Kamei, Yukihiro Noda, Kazuhiro Ishikawa, Koji Senzaki, Isao Muraoka, Yoshinori Hasegawa, Ian Hindmarch, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since most classical (first-generation) antihistamines have undesirable sedative effects on the central nervous system (CNS), newer (second-generation) antihistamines have been developed to relieve the sedative effects and to improve the patient's quality of life. However, the psychomotor profiles of second-generation antihistamines are not fully elucidated. In this randomized, double-blind, crossover study, the acute effects of single doses of second-generation antihistamines, fexofenadine (120 mg) and olopatadine (10 mg), on cognitive and psychomotor performance were investigated in comparison with those of placebo and d-chlorpheniramine (4 mg), a first-generation antihistamine, using objective and subjective assessments, in 11 healthy Japanese volunteers. In a battery of psychomotor tests, d-chlorpheniramine impaired tracking ability in the compensatory tracking task and caused a reduction in behavioural activity as continuously measured by wrist actigraphy. Olopatadine, like d-chlorpheniramine, reduced the behavioural activity, while fexofenadine had no effect in any of the tests. No significant changes in the subjects' self-ratings of drowsiness were found with the three antihistamines. These results suggest that d-chlorpheniramine and olopatadine, but not fexofenadine, produce sedative effects on psychomotor performance, and that the CNS profile of fexofenadine is different from that of olopatadine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)611-618
Number of pages8
JournalHuman Psychopharmacology
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2003
Externally publishedYes

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fexofenadine
Chlorpheniramine
Non-Sedating Histamine H1 Antagonists
Histamine Antagonists
Healthy Volunteers
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Placebos
Psychomotor Performance
Central Nervous System
Actigraphy
Aptitude
Sleep Stages
Wrist
Double-Blind Method
Cross-Over Studies
Quality of Life
Olopatadine Hydrochloride

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Kamei, Hiroyuki ; Noda, Yukihiro ; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro ; Senzaki, Koji ; Muraoka, Isao ; Hasegawa, Yoshinori ; Hindmarch, Ian ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka. / Comparative study of acute effects of single doses of fexofenadine, olopatadine, d-chlorpheniramine and placebo on psychomotor function in healthy volunteers. In: Human Psychopharmacology. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 611-618.
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Comparative study of acute effects of single doses of fexofenadine, olopatadine, d-chlorpheniramine and placebo on psychomotor function in healthy volunteers. / Kamei, Hiroyuki; Noda, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Senzaki, Koji; Muraoka, Isao; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hindmarch, Ian; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

In: Human Psychopharmacology, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.12.2003, p. 611-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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