Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk: The Ohsaki Cohort Study

Michiko Shigihara, Taku Obara, Masato Nagai, Yumi Sugawara, Takashi Watanabe, Masako Kakizaki, Yoshikazu Nishino, Shinichi Kuriyama, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40-79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40-1.68, trend P= 0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35-1.20, trend P= 0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46-1.73, trend P= 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33-1.35, trend P= 0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46-1.84, trend P= 0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014

Fingerprint

Seaweed
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Oceans and Seas
Vegetables
Fruit
Cohort Studies
Incidence
National Health Programs
Registries
Neoplasms
Japan
Confidence Intervals
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Shigihara, Michiko ; Obara, Taku ; Nagai, Masato ; Sugawara, Yumi ; Watanabe, Takashi ; Kakizaki, Masako ; Nishino, Yoshikazu ; Kuriyama, Shinichi ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk : The Ohsaki Cohort Study. In: Cancer Epidemiology. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 129-136.
@article{d922a3aa2e154983aa0cc508b8ac7843,
title = "Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk: The Ohsaki Cohort Study",
abstract = "Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40-79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95{\%} confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40-1.68, trend P= 0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35-1.20, trend P= 0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46-1.73, trend P= 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33-1.35, trend P= 0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46-1.84, trend P= 0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.",
author = "Michiko Shigihara and Taku Obara and Masato Nagai and Yumi Sugawara and Takashi Watanabe and Masako Kakizaki and Yoshikazu Nishino and Shinichi Kuriyama and Ichiro Tsuji",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.canep.2014.01.001",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "129--136",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology",
issn = "1877-7821",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

Shigihara, M, Obara, T, Nagai, M, Sugawara, Y, Watanabe, T, Kakizaki, M, Nishino, Y, Kuriyama, S & Tsuji, I 2014, 'Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk: The Ohsaki Cohort Study', Cancer Epidemiology, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 129-136. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2014.01.001

Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk : The Ohsaki Cohort Study. / Shigihara, Michiko; Obara, Taku; Nagai, Masato; Sugawara, Yumi; Watanabe, Takashi; Kakizaki, Masako; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 129-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk

T2 - The Ohsaki Cohort Study

AU - Shigihara, Michiko

AU - Obara, Taku

AU - Nagai, Masato

AU - Sugawara, Yumi

AU - Watanabe, Takashi

AU - Kakizaki, Masako

AU - Nishino, Yoshikazu

AU - Kuriyama, Shinichi

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40-79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40-1.68, trend P= 0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35-1.20, trend P= 0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46-1.73, trend P= 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33-1.35, trend P= 0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46-1.84, trend P= 0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.

AB - Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40-79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40-1.68, trend P= 0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35-1.20, trend P= 0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46-1.73, trend P= 0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33-1.35, trend P= 0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46-1.84, trend P= 0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898019952&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84898019952&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.canep.2014.01.001

DO - 10.1016/j.canep.2014.01.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 24522236

AN - SCOPUS:84898019952

VL - 38

SP - 129

EP - 136

JO - Cancer Epidemiology

JF - Cancer Epidemiology

SN - 1877-7821

IS - 2

ER -