Cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein H-based serological analysis in Japanese healthy pregnant women, and in neonates with congenital CMV infection and their mothers

Kazufumi Ikuta, Toshio Minematsu, Naoki Inoue, Takahiko Kubo, Kimisato Asano, Kei Ishibashi, Takashi Imamura, Hidetaka Nakai, Tetsushi Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki Moriuchi, Shigeyoshi Fujiwara, Shin Koyano, Tatsuo Suzutani

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Abstract

Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is caused by maternal primary infection as well as CMV reinfection or reactivation during pregnancy, although differences in the clinical impact between these modes of infection remain to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the latest prevalence and risk of multiple CMV infection in healthy pregnant women, as well as the types of maternal CMV infection associated with congenital CMV infection. Study design: Seroprevalence against CMV and IgG subclasses were determined in 344 serum samples from healthy pregnant women in Japan. CMV genotype and serotype were also determined in 18 pairs of mothers and neonates with congenital CMV infection identified in our CMV screening program. Results: Thirty-two percent of the pregnant women were seronegative, while 66% of CMV seropositive women had IgG3 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein H (gH) as the major subclass, and 52% had IgG1 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein B (gB). Only a single genotype determined by CMV gH neutralizing epitope was found in the urine from the 18 neonates with congenital CMV infection, even though one case possessed antibodies against multiple CMV strains. In that case, the antibodies against the strain not detected in the urine from the infant disappeared within one month after birth, whereas the antibodies against the infecting CMV strain continued to be detected at 12 months after birth. Conclusions: Two (11%) of 18 cases of congenital CMV infection occurred via maternal CMV reinfection. Maternal humoral immunity did not prevent congenital CMV infection with another gH subtype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-478
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2013

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Cytomegalovirus Infections
Cytomegalovirus
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Newborn Infant
Antibodies
Epitopes
Glycoproteins
Immunoglobulin G
Genotype
Urine
Parturition
Cytomegalovirus glycoprotein H
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Humoral Immunity
Infection
Japan
Pregnancy
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ikuta, Kazufumi ; Minematsu, Toshio ; Inoue, Naoki ; Kubo, Takahiko ; Asano, Kimisato ; Ishibashi, Kei ; Imamura, Takashi ; Nakai, Hidetaka ; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi ; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki ; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi ; Koyano, Shin ; Suzutani, Tatsuo. / Cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein H-based serological analysis in Japanese healthy pregnant women, and in neonates with congenital CMV infection and their mothers. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2013 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 474-478.
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abstract = "Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is caused by maternal primary infection as well as CMV reinfection or reactivation during pregnancy, although differences in the clinical impact between these modes of infection remain to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the latest prevalence and risk of multiple CMV infection in healthy pregnant women, as well as the types of maternal CMV infection associated with congenital CMV infection. Study design: Seroprevalence against CMV and IgG subclasses were determined in 344 serum samples from healthy pregnant women in Japan. CMV genotype and serotype were also determined in 18 pairs of mothers and neonates with congenital CMV infection identified in our CMV screening program. Results: Thirty-two percent of the pregnant women were seronegative, while 66{\%} of CMV seropositive women had IgG3 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein H (gH) as the major subclass, and 52{\%} had IgG1 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein B (gB). Only a single genotype determined by CMV gH neutralizing epitope was found in the urine from the 18 neonates with congenital CMV infection, even though one case possessed antibodies against multiple CMV strains. In that case, the antibodies against the strain not detected in the urine from the infant disappeared within one month after birth, whereas the antibodies against the infecting CMV strain continued to be detected at 12 months after birth. Conclusions: Two (11{\%}) of 18 cases of congenital CMV infection occurred via maternal CMV reinfection. Maternal humoral immunity did not prevent congenital CMV infection with another gH subtype.",
author = "Kazufumi Ikuta and Toshio Minematsu and Naoki Inoue and Takahiko Kubo and Kimisato Asano and Kei Ishibashi and Takashi Imamura and Hidetaka Nakai and Tetsushi Yoshikawa and Hiroyuki Moriuchi and Shigeyoshi Fujiwara and Shin Koyano and Tatsuo Suzutani",
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Ikuta, K, Minematsu, T, Inoue, N, Kubo, T, Asano, K, Ishibashi, K, Imamura, T, Nakai, H, Yoshikawa, T, Moriuchi, H, Fujiwara, S, Koyano, S & Suzutani, T 2013, 'Cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein H-based serological analysis in Japanese healthy pregnant women, and in neonates with congenital CMV infection and their mothers', Journal of Clinical Virology, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 474-478. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2013.07.004

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein H-based serological analysis in Japanese healthy pregnant women, and in neonates with congenital CMV infection and their mothers. / Ikuta, Kazufumi; Minematsu, Toshio; Inoue, Naoki; Kubo, Takahiko; Asano, Kimisato; Ishibashi, Kei; Imamura, Takashi; Nakai, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Koyano, Shin; Suzutani, Tatsuo.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.10.2013, p. 474-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein H-based serological analysis in Japanese healthy pregnant women, and in neonates with congenital CMV infection and their mothers

AU - Ikuta, Kazufumi

AU - Minematsu, Toshio

AU - Inoue, Naoki

AU - Kubo, Takahiko

AU - Asano, Kimisato

AU - Ishibashi, Kei

AU - Imamura, Takashi

AU - Nakai, Hidetaka

AU - Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

AU - Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

AU - Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

AU - Koyano, Shin

AU - Suzutani, Tatsuo

PY - 2013/10/1

Y1 - 2013/10/1

N2 - Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is caused by maternal primary infection as well as CMV reinfection or reactivation during pregnancy, although differences in the clinical impact between these modes of infection remain to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the latest prevalence and risk of multiple CMV infection in healthy pregnant women, as well as the types of maternal CMV infection associated with congenital CMV infection. Study design: Seroprevalence against CMV and IgG subclasses were determined in 344 serum samples from healthy pregnant women in Japan. CMV genotype and serotype were also determined in 18 pairs of mothers and neonates with congenital CMV infection identified in our CMV screening program. Results: Thirty-two percent of the pregnant women were seronegative, while 66% of CMV seropositive women had IgG3 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein H (gH) as the major subclass, and 52% had IgG1 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein B (gB). Only a single genotype determined by CMV gH neutralizing epitope was found in the urine from the 18 neonates with congenital CMV infection, even though one case possessed antibodies against multiple CMV strains. In that case, the antibodies against the strain not detected in the urine from the infant disappeared within one month after birth, whereas the antibodies against the infecting CMV strain continued to be detected at 12 months after birth. Conclusions: Two (11%) of 18 cases of congenital CMV infection occurred via maternal CMV reinfection. Maternal humoral immunity did not prevent congenital CMV infection with another gH subtype.

AB - Background: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is caused by maternal primary infection as well as CMV reinfection or reactivation during pregnancy, although differences in the clinical impact between these modes of infection remain to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the latest prevalence and risk of multiple CMV infection in healthy pregnant women, as well as the types of maternal CMV infection associated with congenital CMV infection. Study design: Seroprevalence against CMV and IgG subclasses were determined in 344 serum samples from healthy pregnant women in Japan. CMV genotype and serotype were also determined in 18 pairs of mothers and neonates with congenital CMV infection identified in our CMV screening program. Results: Thirty-two percent of the pregnant women were seronegative, while 66% of CMV seropositive women had IgG3 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein H (gH) as the major subclass, and 52% had IgG1 antibodies against one epitope on glycoprotein B (gB). Only a single genotype determined by CMV gH neutralizing epitope was found in the urine from the 18 neonates with congenital CMV infection, even though one case possessed antibodies against multiple CMV strains. In that case, the antibodies against the strain not detected in the urine from the infant disappeared within one month after birth, whereas the antibodies against the infecting CMV strain continued to be detected at 12 months after birth. Conclusions: Two (11%) of 18 cases of congenital CMV infection occurred via maternal CMV reinfection. Maternal humoral immunity did not prevent congenital CMV infection with another gH subtype.

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