Determinants of self-rated health: Could health status explain the association between self-rated health and mortality?

Chiyoe Murata, Takaaki Kondo, Koji Tamakoshi, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Hideaki Toyoshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to self-rated health and to mortality among 2490 community-living elderly. Respondents were followed for 7.3 years for all-cause mortality. To compare the relative impact of each variable, we employed logistic regression analysis for self-rated health and Cox hazard analysis for mortality. Cox analysis stratified by gender, follow-up periods, age group, and functional status was also employed. Series of analysis found that factors associated with self-rated health and with mortality were not identical. Psychological factors such as perceived isolation at home or 'ikigai (one aspect of psychological well-being)' were associated with self-rated health only. Age, functional status, and social relations were associated both with self-rated health and mortality after controlling for possible confounders. Illnesses and functional status accounted for 35-40% of variances in the fair/poor self-rated health. Differences by gender and functional status were observed in the factors related to self-rated health. Overall, self-rated health effect on mortality was stronger for people with no functional impairment, for shorter follow-up period, and for young-old age group. Although, illnesses and functional status were major determinants of self-rated health, economical, psychological, and social factors were also related to self-rated health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-380
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-11-2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Status
health status
mortality
determinants
Mortality
Health
health
psychological factors
Psychology
age group
illness
Age Groups
gender
Social Relations
Statistical Factor Analysis
social factors
social isolation
regression analysis
Logistic Models
well-being

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Ageing
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to self-rated health and to mortality among 2490 community-living elderly. Respondents were followed for 7.3 years for all-cause mortality. To compare the relative impact of each variable, we employed logistic regression analysis for self-rated health and Cox hazard analysis for mortality. Cox analysis stratified by gender, follow-up periods, age group, and functional status was also employed. Series of analysis found that factors associated with self-rated health and with mortality were not identical. Psychological factors such as perceived isolation at home or 'ikigai (one aspect of psychological well-being)' were associated with self-rated health only. Age, functional status, and social relations were associated both with self-rated health and mortality after controlling for possible confounders. Illnesses and functional status accounted for 35-40{\%} of variances in the fair/poor self-rated health. Differences by gender and functional status were observed in the factors related to self-rated health. Overall, self-rated health effect on mortality was stronger for people with no functional impairment, for shorter follow-up period, and for young-old age group. Although, illnesses and functional status were major determinants of self-rated health, economical, psychological, and social factors were also related to self-rated health.",
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Determinants of self-rated health : Could health status explain the association between self-rated health and mortality? / Murata, Chiyoe; Kondo, Takaaki; Tamakoshi, Koji; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Hideaki.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.11.2006, p. 369-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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