Discontinuation of donepezil for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in geriatric practice

Hiroyuki Umegaki, Akio Itoh, Yusuke Suzuki, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Maintaining continuous pharmacological treatment of patients with dementia is often difficult. In the current study we surveyed the discontinuation of donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese geriatric outpatient clinic in a university hospital. Methods: Using a retrospective chart review from 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2005, prescriptions of donepezil and the reasons for discontinuing the prescription in a university hospital were determined. The severity of dementia was evaluated by the clinical dementia rating (CDR). Results: Out of 264 patients, 140 (53.1%) discontinued taking donepezil during the two-year observation period. The mean age of the continued group and the discontinued group did not differ significantly (79.5 ± 6.7, 79.8 ± 6.4, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the patients with more severe cognitive impairment (CDR score = 3) discontinued donepezil earlier and more frequently. The reasons for discontinuation were a change in the doctors treating the patients (n = 71), ineffectiveness (n = 16), gastrointestinal side-effects (n = 11), and others (n = 41). In patients with CDR = 1 or 2, changes of doctors were the most frequent reason for discontinuation. However, in patients with CDR = 3, ineffectiveness of the medication was the major reason for discontinuation. Conclusion: Donepezil was frequently discontinued, and the rate of discontinuation was higher in patients with advanced dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)800-806
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2008
Externally publishedYes

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Geriatrics
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Therapeutics
Prescriptions
Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Ambulatory Care Facilities
donepezil
Age Groups
Observation
Pharmacology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Maintaining continuous pharmacological treatment of patients with dementia is often difficult. In the current study we surveyed the discontinuation of donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese geriatric outpatient clinic in a university hospital. Methods: Using a retrospective chart review from 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2005, prescriptions of donepezil and the reasons for discontinuing the prescription in a university hospital were determined. The severity of dementia was evaluated by the clinical dementia rating (CDR). Results: Out of 264 patients, 140 (53.1{\%}) discontinued taking donepezil during the two-year observation period. The mean age of the continued group and the discontinued group did not differ significantly (79.5 ± 6.7, 79.8 ± 6.4, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the patients with more severe cognitive impairment (CDR score = 3) discontinued donepezil earlier and more frequently. The reasons for discontinuation were a change in the doctors treating the patients (n = 71), ineffectiveness (n = 16), gastrointestinal side-effects (n = 11), and others (n = 41). In patients with CDR = 1 or 2, changes of doctors were the most frequent reason for discontinuation. However, in patients with CDR = 3, ineffectiveness of the medication was the major reason for discontinuation. Conclusion: Donepezil was frequently discontinued, and the rate of discontinuation was higher in patients with advanced dementia.",
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Discontinuation of donepezil for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in geriatric practice. / Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Akio; Suzuki, Yusuke; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.08.2008, p. 800-806.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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