Distinct effect of body mass index by sex as a prognostic factor in localized renal cell carcinoma treated with nephrectomy ~ data from a multi-institutional study in Japan ~

Takeshi Tsutsumi, Kazumasa Komura, Takeshi Hashimoto, Ryu Muraoka, Naoya Satake, Tomohisa Matsunaga, Takuya Tsujino, Yuki Yoshikawa, Tomoaki Takai, Koichiro Minami, Kohei Taniguchi, Tomohito Tanaka, Hirofumi Uehara, Hajime Hirano, Hayahito Nomi, Naokazu Ibuki, Kiyoshi Takahara, Teruo Inamoto, Yoshio Ohno, Haruhito Azuma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: We assessed the prognostic value of body mass index (BMI) in Asian patients with localized RCC who underwent nephrectomy. Methods: A total of 665 patients who underwent nephrectomy for localized RCC were enrolled in the present study and divided into the two BMI groups: i.e., BMI < 25 in 463 (69.6%) and BMI > 25 in 202 (30.4%) patients. Results: In total, there were 482 (72.5%) males and 183 (27.5%) females. Five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rates were significantly higher in increased BMI than the lower BMI group (97.1 and 92.5%: P = 0.007). When stratified by sex, significantly longer CSS in higher BMI was confirmed in males (5-year CSS of 92.7% in BMI < 25 and 98.1% in BMI > 25, p = 0.005), while there was no difference in CSS between BMI groups for female patients. Multivariable analysis exhibited that higher BMI was an independent predictor for favorable CSS in male (cox model: p = 0.041, Fine & Gray regression model: p = 0.014), but not in the female. Subgroup analysis for CSS revealed that favorable CSS with higher BMI was observed in patient subgroups of age < 65 (p = 0.019), clear cell histology (p = 0.018), and tumor size > 4 cm, p = 0.020) as well as male (p = 0.020). Conclusion: Our findings collected from the multi-institutional Japanese dataset demonstrated longer survival in patients with higher BMI than lower BMI for non-metastatic RCC treated with nephrectomy. Intriguingly, this finding was restricted to males, but not to females.

Original languageEnglish
Article number201
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12-2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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