Dopamine D1 receptors regulate protein synthesis-dependent long-term recognition memory via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the prefrontal cortex

Taku Nagai, Kazuhiro Takuma, Hiroyuki Kamei, Yukio Ito, Noritaka Nakamichi, Daisuke Ibi, Yutaka Nakanishi, Masaaki Murai, Hiroyuki Mizoguchi, Toshitaka Nabeshima, Kiyofumi Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest that extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and dopaminergic system is involved in learning and memory. However, it remains to be determined if the dopaminergic system and ERK1/2 pathway contribute to cognitive function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The amount of phosphorylated ERK1/2 was increased in the PFC immediately after exposure to novel objects in the training session of the novel object recognition test. An inhibitor of ERK kinase impaired long-term recognition memory 24 h after the training although short-term memory tested 1 h after the training was not affected by the treatment. The dopamine D1 receptor agonist increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the PFC in vivo as well as in cortical neurons in vitro. Microinjection of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist into the PFC impaired long-term recognition memory whereas the D2 receptor antagonist had no effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that exposure to novel objects resulted in an increase in c-Fos expression in the PFC. Microinjection of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin into the PFC impaired the long-term recognition memory. These results suggest that the activation of ERK1/2 following the stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors is necessary for the protein synthesis-dependent long-term retention of recognition memory in the PFC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2007
Externally publishedYes

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Dopamine D1 Receptors
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3
Long-Term Memory
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1
Prefrontal Cortex
Proteins
Microinjections
Anisomycin
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
Dopamine Antagonists
Dopamine Agonists
Recognition (Psychology)
Short-Term Memory
Cognition
Phosphotransferases
Immunohistochemistry
Phosphorylation
Learning
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Nagai, Taku ; Takuma, Kazuhiro ; Kamei, Hiroyuki ; Ito, Yukio ; Nakamichi, Noritaka ; Ibi, Daisuke ; Nakanishi, Yutaka ; Murai, Masaaki ; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka ; Yamada, Kiyofumi. / Dopamine D1 receptors regulate protein synthesis-dependent long-term recognition memory via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the prefrontal cortex. In: Learning and Memory. 2007 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 117-125.
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Nagai, T, Takuma, K, Kamei, H, Ito, Y, Nakamichi, N, Ibi, D, Nakanishi, Y, Murai, M, Mizoguchi, H, Nabeshima, T & Yamada, K 2007, 'Dopamine D1 receptors regulate protein synthesis-dependent long-term recognition memory via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the prefrontal cortex', Learning and Memory, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 117-125. https://doi.org/10.1101/lm.461407

Dopamine D1 receptors regulate protein synthesis-dependent long-term recognition memory via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the prefrontal cortex. / Nagai, Taku; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukio; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ibi, Daisuke; Nakanishi, Yutaka; Murai, Masaaki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamada, Kiyofumi.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 117-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Nagai, Taku

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AU - Nakamichi, Noritaka

AU - Ibi, Daisuke

AU - Nakanishi, Yutaka

AU - Murai, Masaaki

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AU - Nabeshima, Toshitaka

AU - Yamada, Kiyofumi

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