Dynamic pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography for investigation of pelvic abnormalities in patients with rectocele and rectal prolapse

Norihiro Okamoto, Koutarou Maeda, Ryoichi Kato, Shyoshi Senga, Harunobu Sato, Ryuji Hosono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dynamic three-dimensional computed tomography (D-3DCT: high-speed helical scanning during defecation) was used for morphological evaluation of intrapelvic structures in patients with rectal prolapse and rectocele. Methods. Twenty-five patients with rectal prolapse or rectocele diagnosed by conventional defecography (CD) or clinical findings were additionally investigated with D-3DCT. D-3DCT images were acquired using a multislice CT system with a 16-row detector during simulated defecation. Helical scanning was performed with a slice thickness of 1mm, a helical pitch of 15 s/rotation, and a table movement speed of 35 mm/s. The contrast medium, 100 ml of iopamidol (370 mg/ml), was injected at a rate of 2.5 ml/s to enhance contrast with other structures, and scan start was triggered by using a function for automatically determining the optimal scan timing. Results: Among the eight patients with rectocele, additional intrapelvic disorders were diagnosed in five (enterocele, 4; cystocele, 1; and uterine prolapse, 1) with D-3DCT. In the 17 patients with rectal prolapse, concomitant intrapelvic disorders were found in six (intussusception, 3; cystocele, 2; uterine prolapse, 2; rectocele, 1; and vaginal prolapse, 1). Conclusions. D-3DCT can be a useful diagnostic tool for investigation of pelvic pathology in patients with rectocele and rectal prolapse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)802-806
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 09-2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

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