Effect of illness uncertainty on alanine transaminase levels and aspartate aminotransferase levels in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Naoki Ozawa, Kazuki Sato, Ayumi Sugimura, Shigeyoshi Maki, Taku Tanaka, Kenta Yamamoto, Takanori Ito, Yoji Ishizu, Teiji Kuzuya, Takashi Honda, Masatoshi Ishigami, Mitsuhiro Fujishiro, Tetsuya Ishikawa, Shoko Ando

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have illness uncertainty. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the effect of the degree of illness uncertainty in patients with NAFLD on liver function values. We conducted a questionnaire survey and collected blood samples from outpatients with NAFLD. The items in the questionnaire were measured for illness uncertainty using the Japanese version of the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Community (MUIS-C). Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 1 year. We divided the patients into two groups: one with high illness uncertainty and the other with low illness uncertainty. We then compared changes in alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels over time from baseline using multiple regression analysis. This study analyzed 148 patients with NAFLD; 75 were male and 73 were female, with a mean age of 58.4 ± 12.3 years. The group with higher illness uncertainty had significantly higher ALT and AST levels at 1 year (b =.185 and.183, respectively) than the group with lower illness uncertainty. High illness uncertainty in patients with NAFLD can lead to higher ALT and AST levels. Healthcare providers must focus on reducing illness uncertainty in patients with NAFLD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)857-864
Number of pages8
JournalNagoya journal of medical science
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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