Effects of Aloe arborescens ingestion on azoxymethane-induced intestinal carcinogenesis and hematological and biochemical parameters of male F344 rats

Kan Shimpo, Hidehiko Beppu, Takeshi Chihara, Takaaki Kaneko, Masanori Shinzato, Shigeru Sonoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the modifying effect of freeze-dried whole-leaf Aloe arborescens Miller var. natalensis Berger (Kidachi aloe in Japan; designated as 'ALOE') on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced intestinal carcinogenesis in rats. Male F344 rats (4 weeks old) were fed basal diet or experimental diet containing 0.2% or 1% ALOE for 28 weeks. Starting two weeks later, the animals received subcutaneous injections of AOM once weekly for 10 weeks. The incidence of colorectal adenocarcinomas in the 0.2% (but not 1%) ALOE group showed a strong tendency for decrease (p = 0.056) from the control group. Further, the adenocarcinoma incidence in the entire intestine (small and large intestines) in the 0.2% ALOE group was significantly (p = 0.024) decreased compared to the control value. However, there were no significant differences in tumor multiplicities of colorectal or entire intestines among the 3 groups. In addition, we also studied the safety of long-term ingestion of ALOE as a health food or natural thickening stabilizer. Rats were fed the basal diet or 1% ALOE diet for 35 weeks without AOM treatment. Feeding with 1% ALOE did not affect most hematological and serum biochemical parameters in the rats. These results indicate that a low level of ALOE ingestion might have a mild suppressive effect on intestinal tumor growth without harmful side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)585-590
Number of pages6
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume7
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2006

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Azoxymethane
Aloe
Inbred F344 Rats
Carcinogenesis
Eating
Diet
Intestines
Adenocarcinoma
Large Intestine
Incidence
Subcutaneous Injections
Small Intestine
Colorectal Neoplasms
Japan
Safety
Food
Control Groups
Health
Growth
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Effects of Aloe arborescens ingestion on azoxymethane-induced intestinal carcinogenesis and hematological and biochemical parameters of male F344 rats",
abstract = "We examined the modifying effect of freeze-dried whole-leaf Aloe arborescens Miller var. natalensis Berger (Kidachi aloe in Japan; designated as 'ALOE') on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced intestinal carcinogenesis in rats. Male F344 rats (4 weeks old) were fed basal diet or experimental diet containing 0.2{\%} or 1{\%} ALOE for 28 weeks. Starting two weeks later, the animals received subcutaneous injections of AOM once weekly for 10 weeks. The incidence of colorectal adenocarcinomas in the 0.2{\%} (but not 1{\%}) ALOE group showed a strong tendency for decrease (p = 0.056) from the control group. Further, the adenocarcinoma incidence in the entire intestine (small and large intestines) in the 0.2{\%} ALOE group was significantly (p = 0.024) decreased compared to the control value. However, there were no significant differences in tumor multiplicities of colorectal or entire intestines among the 3 groups. In addition, we also studied the safety of long-term ingestion of ALOE as a health food or natural thickening stabilizer. Rats were fed the basal diet or 1{\%} ALOE diet for 35 weeks without AOM treatment. Feeding with 1{\%} ALOE did not affect most hematological and serum biochemical parameters in the rats. These results indicate that a low level of ALOE ingestion might have a mild suppressive effect on intestinal tumor growth without harmful side effects.",
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Effects of Aloe arborescens ingestion on azoxymethane-induced intestinal carcinogenesis and hematological and biochemical parameters of male F344 rats. / Shimpo, Kan; Beppu, Hidehiko; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki; Shinzato, Masanori; Sonoda, Shigeru.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.01.2006, p. 585-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Effects of Aloe arborescens ingestion on azoxymethane-induced intestinal carcinogenesis and hematological and biochemical parameters of male F344 rats

AU - Shimpo, Kan

AU - Beppu, Hidehiko

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AU - Kaneko, Takaaki

AU - Shinzato, Masanori

AU - Sonoda, Shigeru

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