Effects of prescription drug reduction on quality of life in community- dwelling patients with dementia

Mikio Sakakibara, Ataru Igarashi, Yoshimasa Takase, Hiroyuki Kamei, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Due to the use of multiple drugs and prevalence of diminished cognitive function, community-dwelling elderly individuals are more likely to have drug-related issues. We examined changes in quality of life (QOL) and activities of daily living (ADL) 3 months and 6 months after reducing drug use of dementia patients who had newly begun community-dwelling care. Methods: Prescription drug use was reduced in the intervention group, whereas the non-intervention group continued their regimen or began using additional drugs. QOL and ADL were assessed with the Japanese version of the EQ-5D and the Barthel Index, respectively. Results: Subjects were 32 individuals aged ≥65 years who had begun community-dwelling between March and July 2014 and had received approval for long-term care insurance. On average, the intervention group (n = 19) stopped using 2.6 prescription drugs. After 6 months, the differences in the QOL and ADL scores in the intervention group were -0.03 ± 0.29 and 6.32 ± 18.6, respectively, while the differences in the QOL and ADL scores in the non-intervention group (n = 13) were -0.13 ± 0.29 and -2.69 ± 23.7, respectively. In the intervention group, ADL scores were significantly increased by 14.0 ± 11.1 6 months after reduced benzodiazepine use. Conclusions: QOL was maintained with reduced drug use, while ADL score was slightly increased. In addition, the reduction of benzodiazepine use significantly increased ADL. In order to reduce polypharmacy among community-dwelling elderly patients, it is necessary to create an opportunity for pharmacists to re-examine their prescriptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)705-712
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume18
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 10-11-2015

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Independent Living
Prescription Drugs
Activities of Daily Living
Dementia
Quality of Life
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Benzodiazepines
Long-Term Care Insurance
Polypharmacy
Pharmacists
Cognition
Prescriptions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Sakakibara, Mikio ; Igarashi, Ataru ; Takase, Yoshimasa ; Kamei, Hiroyuki ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka. / Effects of prescription drug reduction on quality of life in community- dwelling patients with dementia. In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 705-712.
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Effects of prescription drug reduction on quality of life in community- dwelling patients with dementia. / Sakakibara, Mikio; Igarashi, Ataru; Takase, Yoshimasa; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 5, 10.11.2015, p. 705-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Effects of prescription drug reduction on quality of life in community- dwelling patients with dementia

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AU - Igarashi, Ataru

AU - Takase, Yoshimasa

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AU - Nabeshima, Toshitaka

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N2 - Purpose: Due to the use of multiple drugs and prevalence of diminished cognitive function, community-dwelling elderly individuals are more likely to have drug-related issues. We examined changes in quality of life (QOL) and activities of daily living (ADL) 3 months and 6 months after reducing drug use of dementia patients who had newly begun community-dwelling care. Methods: Prescription drug use was reduced in the intervention group, whereas the non-intervention group continued their regimen or began using additional drugs. QOL and ADL were assessed with the Japanese version of the EQ-5D and the Barthel Index, respectively. Results: Subjects were 32 individuals aged ≥65 years who had begun community-dwelling between March and July 2014 and had received approval for long-term care insurance. On average, the intervention group (n = 19) stopped using 2.6 prescription drugs. After 6 months, the differences in the QOL and ADL scores in the intervention group were -0.03 ± 0.29 and 6.32 ± 18.6, respectively, while the differences in the QOL and ADL scores in the non-intervention group (n = 13) were -0.13 ± 0.29 and -2.69 ± 23.7, respectively. In the intervention group, ADL scores were significantly increased by 14.0 ± 11.1 6 months after reduced benzodiazepine use. Conclusions: QOL was maintained with reduced drug use, while ADL score was slightly increased. In addition, the reduction of benzodiazepine use significantly increased ADL. In order to reduce polypharmacy among community-dwelling elderly patients, it is necessary to create an opportunity for pharmacists to re-examine their prescriptions.

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