Effects of Risperidone on Phencyclidine-Induced Behaviors

Comparison with Haloperidol and Ritanserin

Kiyoyuki Kitaichi, Kiyofumi Yamada, Takaaki Hasegawa, Toshitaka Nabeshima, Hiroshi Furukawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated whether risperidone, a serotonin-S2A(5-HT2A)/dopamine-D2(D2)-receptor antagonist, inhibits phencyclidine (PCP)-induced stereotyped behaviors in comparison with haloperidol and ritanserin. Moreover, we also attempted to investigate the effects of these antipsychotics on the contents of dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in rat striatum and frontal cortex. In rats, PCP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused hyperlocomotion and stereotyped behaviors, including sniffing, head-weaving, backpedalling and turning. Both risperidone (0.8-2.4 mg/kg, p.o.) and haloperidol (0.3-1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited these behaviors, except for backpedalling, in a dose-dependent manner. PCP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced hyperlocomotion and stereotyped behaviors, including rearing, sniffing head-twitch, backpedalling and turning. Risperidone (0.8-2.4 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited both hyperlocomotion and PCP-induced behaviors, except for backpedalling, while ritanserin (3 -10 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited only the head-twitch. These results suggest that risperidone may have an antipsychotic effect on schizophrenia as well as PCP psychosis in humans by exerting a mixed 5-HT2A/D2antagonism. Neurochemically, the increasing effects of risperidone on the content of DOPAC and the ratio of DOPAC to dopamine in the striatum were lower than those of haloperidol. These findings may support the view that the extrapyramidal side effects of risperidone are lower than those of haloperidol in clinical situations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-189
Number of pages9
JournalThe Japanese Journal of Pharmacology
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1994

Fingerprint

Ritanserin
Phencyclidine
Risperidone
Haloperidol
Stereotyped Behavior
3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid
Dopamine
Serotonin
Head
Antipsychotic Agents
Frontal Lobe
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki ; Yamada, Kiyofumi ; Hasegawa, Takaaki ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka ; Furukawa, Hiroshi. / Effects of Risperidone on Phencyclidine-Induced Behaviors : Comparison with Haloperidol and Ritanserin. In: The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology. 1994 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 181-189.
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Effects of Risperidone on Phencyclidine-Induced Behaviors : Comparison with Haloperidol and Ritanserin. / Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Furukawa, Hiroshi.

In: The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.01.1994, p. 181-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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