Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship between Force and Velocity

Yoshito Sugiura, Yasuhiko Hatanaka, Tomoaki Arai, Hiroaki Sakurai, Yoshikiyo Kanada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC (2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC (2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)980-988
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2016

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Torque
Knee
Linear Models
Software
Joints
Body Weight
Regression Analysis
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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title = "Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship between Force and Velocity",
abstract = "We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40{\%} to 150{\%} 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM ({\%} 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and {\%} 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC (2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC (2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.",
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Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship between Force and Velocity. / Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 980-988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sugiura, Yoshito

AU - Hatanaka, Yasuhiko

AU - Arai, Tomoaki

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AU - Kanada, Yoshikiyo

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