Examination of postmortem changes in the lungs, trachea, and bronchi in a rat model imaged with small-animal computed tomography

Takahiro Matsuyama, Seiichiro Ota, Yoshitaka Inui, Naoko Fujii, Tetsuya Tsukamoto, Ichiro Isobe, Katsumi Tsujioka, Shizuko Nagao, Ryosuke Tanabe, Hiroshi Toyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: As less autopsies are performed, the need for postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) as an alternative is increasing. It is important to know how postmortem changes over time are reflected on CT, in order to improve the diagnostic capability of PMCT and replace forensic pathology evaluations such as time of death estimation. Methods: In this study, we examined temporal changes on postmortem chest CT images of a rat model. After acquiring antemortem images under isoflurane inhalation anesthesia, the rats were euthanized with a rapid intravenous injection of anesthetics. From immediately after death to 48 hours postmortem, chest images were acquired using small-animal CT. The 3D images were then evaluated on a workstation to measure the antemortem and postmortem air content in the lungs, trachea, and bronchi over time. Results: The air content in the lungs decreased, but the air content of the trachea and bronchi temporarily increased 1–12 hours postmortem, then decreased at 48 hours postmortem. Therefore, the measurement of trachea and bronchi volumes on PMCT could be an objective way to estimate the time of death. Conclusions: While the air content of the lungs decreased, the volume of the trachea and bronchi temporarily increased after death, indicating the potential to use such measurements to estimate time of death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-104
Number of pages4
JournalFujita Medical Journal
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Medicine
  • General Health Professions

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Examination of postmortem changes in the lungs, trachea, and bronchi in a rat model imaged with small-animal computed tomography'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this