Functional recovery from chronic writer's cramp by brain-computer interface rehabilitation: A case report

Yasunari Hashimoto, Tetsuo Ota, Masahiko Mukaino, Meigen Liu, Junichi Ushiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dystonia is often currently treated with botulinum toxin injections to spastic muscles, or deep brain stimulation to the basal ganglia. In addition to these pharmacological or neurosurgical measures, a new noninvasive treatment concept, functional modulation using a brain-computer interface, was tested for feasibility. We recorded electroencephalograms (EEGs) over the bilateral sensorimotor cortex from a patient suffering from chronic writer's cramp. The patient was asked to suppress an exaggerated beta frequency component in the EEG during hand extension. Results: The patient completed biweekly one-hour training for 5 months without any adverse effects. Significant decrease of the beta frequency component during handwriting was confirmed, and was associated with clear functional improvement. Conclusion: The current pilot study suggests that a brain-computer Interface can give explicit feedback of ongoing cortical excitability to patients with dystonia and allow them to suppress exaggerated neural activity, resulting in functional recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103
JournalBMC Neuroscience
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Dystonic Disorders
Rehabilitation
Dystonia
Electroencephalography
Handwriting
Deep Brain Stimulation
Muscle Spasticity
Botulinum Toxins
Basal Ganglia
Hand
Pharmacology
Muscles
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Hashimoto, Yasunari ; Ota, Tetsuo ; Mukaino, Masahiko ; Liu, Meigen ; Ushiba, Junichi. / Functional recovery from chronic writer's cramp by brain-computer interface rehabilitation : A case report. In: BMC Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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Functional recovery from chronic writer's cramp by brain-computer interface rehabilitation : A case report. / Hashimoto, Yasunari; Ota, Tetsuo; Mukaino, Masahiko; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi.

In: BMC Neuroscience, Vol. 15, No. 1, 103, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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