Genetics and reverse genetics of rotavirus

Koki Taniguchi, Satoshi Komoto

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rotavirus is a member of the family Reoviridae, which have genomes consisting of 10-12 double-stranded RNA segments. The functions of proteins encoded by each segment of the rotavirus genome have been studied extensively by several methods including reassortants, temperature-sensitive mutants, isolates with rearranged RNA segments, RNAi analysis, and other procedures. However, as found for most RNA viruses, the technique of reverse genetics is required for precise genotype/phenotype correlation, for the analysis of the role of specific mutation in replication process and pathogenesis, and for the development of vectors and vaccines. In 2006, we presented the first description of a reverse genetics system for rotavirus, although a helper virus and a selection system are required. Since then, two other approaches have been reported for rotavirus reverse genetics, both requiring the presence of a helper virus. A tractable, helper virus-free reverse genetics system for rotavirus has not been developed so far, in contrast to the recent developments of plasmid only-based reverse genetics systems for other members of the Reoviridae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)399-407
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Virology
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2012

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Reverse Genetics
Rotavirus
Helper Viruses
Reoviridae
Genome
Double-Stranded RNA
RNA Viruses
Genetic Association Studies
RNA Interference
Plasmids
Vaccines
RNA
Mutation
Temperature
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

Taniguchi, Koki ; Komoto, Satoshi. / Genetics and reverse genetics of rotavirus. In: Current Opinion in Virology. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 399-407.
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Genetics and reverse genetics of rotavirus. / Taniguchi, Koki; Komoto, Satoshi.

In: Current Opinion in Virology, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.01.2012, p. 399-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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