Genome-wide association for methamphetamine dependence: Convergent results from 2 samples

George R. Uhl, Tomas Drgon, Qing Rong Liu, Catherine Johnson, Donna Walther, Tokutaro Komiyama, Mutsuo Harano, Yoshimoto Sekine, Toshiya Inada, Norio Ozaki, Masaomi Iyo, Nakao Iwata, Mitsuhiko Yamada, Ichiro Sora, Chih Ken Chen, Hsing Cheng Liu, Hiroshi Ujike, Shih Ku Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Context: We can improve understanding of human methamphetamine dependence, and possibly our abilities to prevent and treat this devastating disorder, by identifying genes whose allelic variants predispose to methamphetamine dependence. Objective: To find "methamphetamine dependence" genes identified by each of 2 genome-wide association (GWA) studies of independent samples of methamphetamine-dependent individuals and matched controls. Design: Replicated GWA results in each of 2 casecontrol studies. Setting: Japan and Taiwan. Participants: Individuals with methamphetamine dependence and matched control subjects free from psychiatric, substance abuse, or substance dependence diagnoses (N=580). Main Outcome Measures: "Methamphetamine dependence" genes that were reproducibly identified by clusters of nominally positive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both samples in ways that were unlikely to represent chance observations, based on Monte Carlo simulations that corrected for multiple comparisons, and subsets of "methamphetamine dependence" genes that were also identified by GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory. Results: Genes identified by clustered nominally positive SNPs from both samples were unlikely to represent chance observations (Monte Carlo P<.00001). Variants in these "methamphetamine dependence" genes are likely to alter cell adhesion, enzymatic functions, transcription, cell structure, and DNA, RNA, and/or protein handling or modification. Cell adhesion genes CSMD1 and CDH13 displayed the largest numbers of clustered nominally positive SNPs. "Methamphetamine dependence" genes overlapped, to extents much greater than chance, with genes identified in GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory (Monte Carlo P range <.04 to <.00001). Conclusion: These data support polygenic contributions to methamphetamine dependence from genes that include those whose variants contribute to dependence on several addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and mnemonic processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-385
Number of pages41
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2008

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Methamphetamine
Genome
Genes
Genome-Wide Association Study
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Smoking
Cell Adhesion
Substance-Related Disorders
Aptitude
Gene
Taiwan
Psychiatry
Japan
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
RNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Uhl, G. R., Drgon, T., Liu, Q. R., Johnson, C., Walther, D., Komiyama, T., ... Lin, S. K. (2008). Genome-wide association for methamphetamine dependence: Convergent results from 2 samples. Archives of General Psychiatry, 65(3), 345-385. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.65.3.345
Uhl, George R. ; Drgon, Tomas ; Liu, Qing Rong ; Johnson, Catherine ; Walther, Donna ; Komiyama, Tokutaro ; Harano, Mutsuo ; Sekine, Yoshimoto ; Inada, Toshiya ; Ozaki, Norio ; Iyo, Masaomi ; Iwata, Nakao ; Yamada, Mitsuhiko ; Sora, Ichiro ; Chen, Chih Ken ; Liu, Hsing Cheng ; Ujike, Hiroshi ; Lin, Shih Ku. / Genome-wide association for methamphetamine dependence : Convergent results from 2 samples. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 345-385.
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abstract = "Context: We can improve understanding of human methamphetamine dependence, and possibly our abilities to prevent and treat this devastating disorder, by identifying genes whose allelic variants predispose to methamphetamine dependence. Objective: To find {"}methamphetamine dependence{"} genes identified by each of 2 genome-wide association (GWA) studies of independent samples of methamphetamine-dependent individuals and matched controls. Design: Replicated GWA results in each of 2 casecontrol studies. Setting: Japan and Taiwan. Participants: Individuals with methamphetamine dependence and matched control subjects free from psychiatric, substance abuse, or substance dependence diagnoses (N=580). Main Outcome Measures: {"}Methamphetamine dependence{"} genes that were reproducibly identified by clusters of nominally positive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both samples in ways that were unlikely to represent chance observations, based on Monte Carlo simulations that corrected for multiple comparisons, and subsets of {"}methamphetamine dependence{"} genes that were also identified by GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory. Results: Genes identified by clustered nominally positive SNPs from both samples were unlikely to represent chance observations (Monte Carlo P<.00001). Variants in these {"}methamphetamine dependence{"} genes are likely to alter cell adhesion, enzymatic functions, transcription, cell structure, and DNA, RNA, and/or protein handling or modification. Cell adhesion genes CSMD1 and CDH13 displayed the largest numbers of clustered nominally positive SNPs. {"}Methamphetamine dependence{"} genes overlapped, to extents much greater than chance, with genes identified in GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory (Monte Carlo P range <.04 to <.00001). Conclusion: These data support polygenic contributions to methamphetamine dependence from genes that include those whose variants contribute to dependence on several addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and mnemonic processes.",
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Uhl, GR, Drgon, T, Liu, QR, Johnson, C, Walther, D, Komiyama, T, Harano, M, Sekine, Y, Inada, T, Ozaki, N, Iyo, M, Iwata, N, Yamada, M, Sora, I, Chen, CK, Liu, HC, Ujike, H & Lin, SK 2008, 'Genome-wide association for methamphetamine dependence: Convergent results from 2 samples', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 65, no. 3, pp. 345-385. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.65.3.345

Genome-wide association for methamphetamine dependence : Convergent results from 2 samples. / Uhl, George R.; Drgon, Tomas; Liu, Qing Rong; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Komiyama, Tokutaro; Harano, Mutsuo; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Inada, Toshiya; Ozaki, Norio; Iyo, Masaomi; Iwata, Nakao; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Sora, Ichiro; Chen, Chih Ken; Liu, Hsing Cheng; Ujike, Hiroshi; Lin, Shih Ku.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 65, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 345-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Uhl, George R.

AU - Drgon, Tomas

AU - Liu, Qing Rong

AU - Johnson, Catherine

AU - Walther, Donna

AU - Komiyama, Tokutaro

AU - Harano, Mutsuo

AU - Sekine, Yoshimoto

AU - Inada, Toshiya

AU - Ozaki, Norio

AU - Iyo, Masaomi

AU - Iwata, Nakao

AU - Yamada, Mitsuhiko

AU - Sora, Ichiro

AU - Chen, Chih Ken

AU - Liu, Hsing Cheng

AU - Ujike, Hiroshi

AU - Lin, Shih Ku

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N2 - Context: We can improve understanding of human methamphetamine dependence, and possibly our abilities to prevent and treat this devastating disorder, by identifying genes whose allelic variants predispose to methamphetamine dependence. Objective: To find "methamphetamine dependence" genes identified by each of 2 genome-wide association (GWA) studies of independent samples of methamphetamine-dependent individuals and matched controls. Design: Replicated GWA results in each of 2 casecontrol studies. Setting: Japan and Taiwan. Participants: Individuals with methamphetamine dependence and matched control subjects free from psychiatric, substance abuse, or substance dependence diagnoses (N=580). Main Outcome Measures: "Methamphetamine dependence" genes that were reproducibly identified by clusters of nominally positive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both samples in ways that were unlikely to represent chance observations, based on Monte Carlo simulations that corrected for multiple comparisons, and subsets of "methamphetamine dependence" genes that were also identified by GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory. Results: Genes identified by clustered nominally positive SNPs from both samples were unlikely to represent chance observations (Monte Carlo P<.00001). Variants in these "methamphetamine dependence" genes are likely to alter cell adhesion, enzymatic functions, transcription, cell structure, and DNA, RNA, and/or protein handling or modification. Cell adhesion genes CSMD1 and CDH13 displayed the largest numbers of clustered nominally positive SNPs. "Methamphetamine dependence" genes overlapped, to extents much greater than chance, with genes identified in GWA studies of dependence on other addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and memory (Monte Carlo P range <.04 to <.00001). Conclusion: These data support polygenic contributions to methamphetamine dependence from genes that include those whose variants contribute to dependence on several addictive substances, success in quitting smoking, and mnemonic processes.

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