Habitual snoring in an outpatient population in Japan

Yuhei Kayukawa, Syuichiro Shirakawa, Toshiji Hayakawa, Makoto Imai, Nakao Iwata, Norio Ozaki, Tatsuro Ohta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to investigate the occurrence and history of sleep problems in Japan, the 11-Centre Collaborative Study on Sleep Problems (COSP) project was carried out. Complaints of snoring are examined, and its prevalence, risk factors and screening reliability are discussed. The subjects who participated in the study were 6445 new outpatients from a general hospital. They were asked to answer a sleep questionnaire that consisted of 34 items with seven demographic items; each item was composed of four grades of frequency. In order to offset possible seasonal variations in sleep habits, data were collected across four seasons. Sleep patterns, insomnia, hypersomnia, parasomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorders were covered. Habitual snoring was seen in 16.0% of males and 6.5% of females. Male predominance was noted. From these data, the relationship between habitual snoring and sleep complaints was statistically analyzed. Habitual snorers (HS) were observed to wake up more frequently during sleep (17.8% of males, 21.5% of females) than were non-habitual snorers (NHS; 6.6% of males, 9.7% of females). Mid-sleep awakening of HS was also more frequent than it was for NHS; however, there were no differences in difficulty in falling asleep and early morning awakening. Body mass index, cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were also correlated with habitual snoring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)385-392
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26-09-2000

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Snoring
Japan
Sleep
Outpatients
Population
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders
Parasomnias
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence
General Hospitals
Alcohol Drinking
Habits
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kayukawa, Y., Shirakawa, S., Hayakawa, T., Imai, M., Iwata, N., Ozaki, N., & Ohta, T. (2000). Habitual snoring in an outpatient population in Japan. Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, 54(4), 385-392. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1819.2000.00726.x
Kayukawa, Yuhei ; Shirakawa, Syuichiro ; Hayakawa, Toshiji ; Imai, Makoto ; Iwata, Nakao ; Ozaki, Norio ; Ohta, Tatsuro. / Habitual snoring in an outpatient population in Japan. In: Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences. 2000 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 385-392.
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Kayukawa, Y, Shirakawa, S, Hayakawa, T, Imai, M, Iwata, N, Ozaki, N & Ohta, T 2000, 'Habitual snoring in an outpatient population in Japan', Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 385-392. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1819.2000.00726.x

Habitual snoring in an outpatient population in Japan. / Kayukawa, Yuhei; Shirakawa, Syuichiro; Hayakawa, Toshiji; Imai, Makoto; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Ohta, Tatsuro.

In: Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, Vol. 54, No. 4, 26.09.2000, p. 385-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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