Healthy cognitive aging and leisure activities among the oldest old in Japan

Takashima study

Hiroko H. Dodge, Yoshikuni Kita, Hajime Takechi, Takehito Hayakawa, Mary Ganguli, Hirotsugu Ueshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Little is known regarding the normative levels of leisure activities among the oldest old and the factors that explain the age-associated decline in these activities. Methods. The sample included 303 cognitively intact community-dwelling elderly persons with no disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and minimal dependency in Instrumental ADL (IADL) in Shiga prefecture, Japan. We examined (i) the nature and frequency of leisure activities, comparing the oldest old versus younger age groups; (ii) factors that explain the age-associated differences in frequencies of engagement in these activities; and (iii) domain-specific cognitive functions associated with these activities, using three summary index scores: physical and nonphysical hobby indexes and social activity index. Results. The oldest old (85 years old or older) showed significantly lower frequency scores in all activity indexes, compared with the youngest old (age 65-74 years). Gait speed or overall mobility consistently explained the age-associated reduction in levels of activities among the oldest old, whereas vision or hearing impairment and depressive symptoms explained only the decline in social activity. Frequency of engagement in nonphysical hobbies was significantly associated with all cognitive domains examined. Conclusions. Knowing the factors that explain age-associated decline in leisure activities can help in planning strategies for maintaining activity levels among elderly persons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1193-1200
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2008

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Leisure Activities
Age Factors
Japan
Hobbies
Activities of Daily Living
Independent Living
Disabled Persons
Hearing Loss
Cognition
Age Groups
Depression
Cognitive Aging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Dodge, Hiroko H. ; Kita, Yoshikuni ; Takechi, Hajime ; Hayakawa, Takehito ; Ganguli, Mary ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu. / Healthy cognitive aging and leisure activities among the oldest old in Japan : Takashima study. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2008 ; Vol. 63, No. 11. pp. 1193-1200.
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Healthy cognitive aging and leisure activities among the oldest old in Japan : Takashima study. / Dodge, Hiroko H.; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takechi, Hajime; Hayakawa, Takehito; Ganguli, Mary; Ueshima, Hirotsugu.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 63, No. 11, 01.01.2008, p. 1193-1200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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