Heart rate variability during massive hemorrhage and progressive hemorrhagic shock in dogs

Masaki Kawase, Toru Komatsu, Kimitoshi Nishiwaki, Tomomasa Kimura, Yoshihiro Fujiwara, Toshimichi Takahashi, Yasuhiro Shimada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the sequential changes in heart rate (HR), autonomic nervous activity presented by the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), hemodynamics and metabolism during massive hemorrhage and progressive hemorrhagic shock in dogs. Methods: Twelve dogs were subjected to acute massive hemorrhage until mean arterial pressure (MAP) reached 50 mmHg. Then bleeding was stopped and they were allowed to reach a plateau phase. They were divided, post hoc, into bradycardic or tachycardic groups according to their HR response to the acute massive hemorrhage. After reaching a plateau phase, the dogs were further bled to keep their MAP around 50 mmHg (progressive hemorrhagic shock). Their heart rate power spectra were quantified into low-frequency (LF) (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF) (0.15-0.4 Hz) components. Results: In the bradycardic group, both LF and HF increased after massive hemorrhage, but during progressive hemorrhagic shock these components decreased while HR increased. In the tachycardic group, LF increased after massive hemorrhage, but during progressive hemorrhagic shock LF decreased with continuous suppression of HF. Conclusion: Massive hemorrhage caused two types of HR response: bradycardia and tachycardia. The HRV profile showed differential autonomic characteristics, and could be a valuable tool in assessing various degrees of hemorrhagic shock.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-814
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Anesthesia
Volume47
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Heart rate variability during massive hemorrhage and progressive hemorrhagic shock in dogs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this