Hemolytic effects of surface roughness of a pump housing in a centrifugal blood pump

Yoshiyuki Takami, Tadashi Nakazawa, Kenzo Makinouchi, Julie Glueck, Robert Benkowski, Yukihiko Nosé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The surface roughness of artificial blood contacting devices is an important surface property that is closely related to blood cell trauma. The present study investigated the effect of the surface roughness of a pump housing on hemolysis in an impeller-type centrifugal blood pump, a pivot bearing supported Gyro C1L3 pump. The purpose of the study was to determine which part of a housing has the greatest surface roughness effect on hemolysis in a centrifugal pump. Seven Gyro C1L3 pumps were prepared, each with a smooth surface impeller and a housing with differing areas of altered surface roughness. Both top and bottom housings were divided into half subregions, each with the same area. Seven test pumps were produced by subjecting various subregions of the housings to vapor polishing and sandblasting. The treated surfaces were then examined by a surface profile instrument. Using these 7 pumps with different areas of altered housing roughness, in vitro hemolysis tests were performed simulating cardiopulmonary bypass (5 L/min, 350 mm Hg). The results of this study are as follows. First, the surface roughness of the top housing had a greater effect on hemolysis than that of the bottom housing. Second, on the surface of the top housing, the surface roughness of the outer half area had a greater effect on hemolysis than that of the inner half area. Third, on the surface of the bottom housing, the surface roughness of the inner half area had a greater effect on hemolysis than that of the outer half area. These findings concur with previous studies of flow patterns in pumps. Thus, it is expected that the method in this study, comparative in vitro hemolysis tests of the pumps with surfaces of the same roughness but different locations, can be used to detect the high shear area inside a pump.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)428-432
Number of pages5
JournalArtificial Organs
Volume21
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 19-06-1997
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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