Human herpesvirus 6 infection in adult living related liver transplant recipients

Masahiro Ohashi, Ken Sugata, Masaru Ihira, Yoshizo Asano, Hiroto Egawa, Yasutsugu Takada, Shinji Uemoto, Tetsushi Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To analyze human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection in adult living related liver transplantation, we performed a virological analysis, including viral isolation, serological assay, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, of serially collected blood samples from 67 recipients. In addition, cytokine levels were measured to determine their role in viral reactivation. HHV-6 was isolated from only 4 recipients (6.0%), and viral DNA was detected in 15 (22.4%) of the 67 recipients. A significant increase in HHV-6 immunoglobulin G antibody titers was observed in 19 (28.4%) of the 67 recipients. Finally, 26 recipients (38.8%) had HHV-6 reactivation 2-6 weeks after transplantation. HHV-6 associated clinical features were analyzed in the 17 recipients presenting with either viremia or DNAemia. Two recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia had unexplained fever at the time of viral infection. An increase in aminotransferase levels was observed in 2 recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia. Recipients with liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infection as the underlying disease were more likely to have HHV-6 infection (P = 0.025). Mortality at the last follow-up in recipients with HHV-6 reactivation was significantly higher than in those without viral reactivation (P = 0.0118). Plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the recipients with HHV-6 viremia than in the recipients without viremia at 4 weeks post-transplant (P = 0.0411). Moreover, tumor necrosis factor a levels were also higher in recipients with HHV-6 viremia (P < 0.0001) or reactivation (P = 0.0011) than in recipients without viremia or reactivation 4 weeks post-transplant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-109
Number of pages10
JournalLiver Transplantation
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2008

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 6
Herpesviridae Infections
Viremia
Liver
Virus Diseases
Transplants
Transplant Recipients
Viral DNA
Transaminases
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Transplantation
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Interleukin-6
Fever
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Immunoglobulin G
Transplantation
Cytokines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Hepatology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Ohashi, Masahiro ; Sugata, Ken ; Ihira, Masaru ; Asano, Yoshizo ; Egawa, Hiroto ; Takada, Yasutsugu ; Uemoto, Shinji ; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi. / Human herpesvirus 6 infection in adult living related liver transplant recipients. In: Liver Transplantation. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 100-109.
@article{e0d62eacfc6e4f3594aaae1893f6808a,
title = "Human herpesvirus 6 infection in adult living related liver transplant recipients",
abstract = "To analyze human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection in adult living related liver transplantation, we performed a virological analysis, including viral isolation, serological assay, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, of serially collected blood samples from 67 recipients. In addition, cytokine levels were measured to determine their role in viral reactivation. HHV-6 was isolated from only 4 recipients (6.0{\%}), and viral DNA was detected in 15 (22.4{\%}) of the 67 recipients. A significant increase in HHV-6 immunoglobulin G antibody titers was observed in 19 (28.4{\%}) of the 67 recipients. Finally, 26 recipients (38.8{\%}) had HHV-6 reactivation 2-6 weeks after transplantation. HHV-6 associated clinical features were analyzed in the 17 recipients presenting with either viremia or DNAemia. Two recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia had unexplained fever at the time of viral infection. An increase in aminotransferase levels was observed in 2 recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia. Recipients with liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infection as the underlying disease were more likely to have HHV-6 infection (P = 0.025). Mortality at the last follow-up in recipients with HHV-6 reactivation was significantly higher than in those without viral reactivation (P = 0.0118). Plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the recipients with HHV-6 viremia than in the recipients without viremia at 4 weeks post-transplant (P = 0.0411). Moreover, tumor necrosis factor a levels were also higher in recipients with HHV-6 viremia (P < 0.0001) or reactivation (P = 0.0011) than in recipients without viremia or reactivation 4 weeks post-transplant.",
author = "Masahiro Ohashi and Ken Sugata and Masaru Ihira and Yoshizo Asano and Hiroto Egawa and Yasutsugu Takada and Shinji Uemoto and Tetsushi Yoshikawa",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/lt.21304",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "100--109",
journal = "Liver Transplantation",
issn = "1527-6465",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Human herpesvirus 6 infection in adult living related liver transplant recipients. / Ohashi, Masahiro; Sugata, Ken; Ihira, Masaru; Asano, Yoshizo; Egawa, Hiroto; Takada, Yasutsugu; Uemoto, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi.

In: Liver Transplantation, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 100-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human herpesvirus 6 infection in adult living related liver transplant recipients

AU - Ohashi, Masahiro

AU - Sugata, Ken

AU - Ihira, Masaru

AU - Asano, Yoshizo

AU - Egawa, Hiroto

AU - Takada, Yasutsugu

AU - Uemoto, Shinji

AU - Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - To analyze human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection in adult living related liver transplantation, we performed a virological analysis, including viral isolation, serological assay, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, of serially collected blood samples from 67 recipients. In addition, cytokine levels were measured to determine their role in viral reactivation. HHV-6 was isolated from only 4 recipients (6.0%), and viral DNA was detected in 15 (22.4%) of the 67 recipients. A significant increase in HHV-6 immunoglobulin G antibody titers was observed in 19 (28.4%) of the 67 recipients. Finally, 26 recipients (38.8%) had HHV-6 reactivation 2-6 weeks after transplantation. HHV-6 associated clinical features were analyzed in the 17 recipients presenting with either viremia or DNAemia. Two recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia had unexplained fever at the time of viral infection. An increase in aminotransferase levels was observed in 2 recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia. Recipients with liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infection as the underlying disease were more likely to have HHV-6 infection (P = 0.025). Mortality at the last follow-up in recipients with HHV-6 reactivation was significantly higher than in those without viral reactivation (P = 0.0118). Plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the recipients with HHV-6 viremia than in the recipients without viremia at 4 weeks post-transplant (P = 0.0411). Moreover, tumor necrosis factor a levels were also higher in recipients with HHV-6 viremia (P < 0.0001) or reactivation (P = 0.0011) than in recipients without viremia or reactivation 4 weeks post-transplant.

AB - To analyze human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection in adult living related liver transplantation, we performed a virological analysis, including viral isolation, serological assay, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, of serially collected blood samples from 67 recipients. In addition, cytokine levels were measured to determine their role in viral reactivation. HHV-6 was isolated from only 4 recipients (6.0%), and viral DNA was detected in 15 (22.4%) of the 67 recipients. A significant increase in HHV-6 immunoglobulin G antibody titers was observed in 19 (28.4%) of the 67 recipients. Finally, 26 recipients (38.8%) had HHV-6 reactivation 2-6 weeks after transplantation. HHV-6 associated clinical features were analyzed in the 17 recipients presenting with either viremia or DNAemia. Two recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia had unexplained fever at the time of viral infection. An increase in aminotransferase levels was observed in 2 recipients with viremia and 3 recipients with DNAemia. Recipients with liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infection as the underlying disease were more likely to have HHV-6 infection (P = 0.025). Mortality at the last follow-up in recipients with HHV-6 reactivation was significantly higher than in those without viral reactivation (P = 0.0118). Plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the recipients with HHV-6 viremia than in the recipients without viremia at 4 weeks post-transplant (P = 0.0411). Moreover, tumor necrosis factor a levels were also higher in recipients with HHV-6 viremia (P < 0.0001) or reactivation (P = 0.0011) than in recipients without viremia or reactivation 4 weeks post-transplant.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38649122745&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38649122745&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/lt.21304

DO - 10.1002/lt.21304

M3 - Article

C2 - 18161770

AN - SCOPUS:38649122745

VL - 14

SP - 100

EP - 109

JO - Liver Transplantation

JF - Liver Transplantation

SN - 1527-6465

IS - 1

ER -