Impact of Gut Microbiota on Host Aggression: Potential Applications for Therapeutic Interventions Early in Development

Katsunaka Mikami, Natsuru Watanabe, Takumi Tochio, Keitaro Kimoto, Fumiaki Akama, Kenji Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aggression in the animal kingdom is a necessary component of life; however, certain forms of aggression, especially in humans, are pathological behaviors that are detrimental to society. Animal models have been used to study a number of factors, including brain morphology, neuropeptides, alcohol consumption, and early life circumstances, to unravel the mechanisms underlying aggression. These animal models have shown validity as experimental models. Moreover, recent studies using mouse, dog, hamster, and drosophila models have indicated that aggression may be affected by the “microbiota–gut–brain axis.” Disturbing the gut microbiota of pregnant animals increases aggression in their offspring. In addition, behavioral analyses using germ-free mice have shown that manipulating the intestinal microbiota during early development suppresses aggression. These studies suggest that treating the host gut microbiota during early development is critical. However, few clinical studies have investigated gut-microbiota-targeted treatments with aggression as a primary endpoint. This review aims to clarify the effects of gut microbiota on aggression and discusses the therapeutic potential of regulating human aggression by intervening in gut microbiota.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1008
JournalMicroorganisms
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 04-2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Virology

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