Impact of Hemodialysis on Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Lower Extremity Bypass Surgery for Peripheral Artery Disease—10-year Follow-Up Study

Yoshitaka Kumada, Norikazu Kawai, Narihiro Ishida, Akihiro Mori, Hideki Ishii, Satoru Ohshima, Ryuta Ito, Norio Umemoto, Hiroshi Takahashi, Toyoaki Murohara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated the clinical impact of hemodialysis on long-term outcomes of bypass surgery in patients with peripheral artery disease. We evaluated 660 consecutive patients who underwent successful bypass surgery (392 hemodialysis and 268 non-hemodialysis). The endpoint was amputation-free survival (AFS). To minimize differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups, propensity score matching was performed. The AFS rates for 10-year follow-up were 39.3% and 67.7% in hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis patients [hazard ratio (HR) 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65–3.01, P <.0001]. Cumulative incidence of amputation was higher in the hemodialysis group than in the non-hemodialysis group [(19.4 vs 8.4%, HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.29–3.74, P =.0027). In a matched cohort (n = 210 each), AFS was still lower in the hemodialysis patients (53.1 vs 66.3%, HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.36–2.82, P =.0003). However, there was no significant difference in amputation rate between the groups (10.5 vs 10.6%, HR.97, 95% CI 0.49–1.87, P =.93). In a sub-analysis of patients with critical limb ischemia, similar results were obtained. The 10-year AFS was consistently lower in the hemodialysis group than in the non-hemodialysis group. However, the amputation rate was comparable between the groups when matched for the differences in clinical characteristics.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAngiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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