Impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes of open-door laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy

Minimum 5-year follow-up study

Morio Matsumoto, Kota Watanabe, Naobumi Hosogane, Takashi Tsuji, Ken Ishii, Masaya Nakamura, Kazuhiro Chiba, Yoshiaki Toyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design: A prospective follow-up study. Objective: To elucidate the impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes after open-door laminoplasty. Summary of Background Data: In a previous study, we did not find significant associations between lamina closure and short-term outcomes. Methods: Of the original cohort of 82 patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty, 69 were included in this study (52 men, 17 women; mean age, 60.9 yr; mean follow-up, 6.2 yr; 56 with spondylosis or disc herniation, 13 with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament). Lamina closure was previously observed in 23 of these patients (closure group) but not in 46 (nonclosure group). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire were recorded. Results: The JOA score was 9.9 ± 3.2 in the closure group and 11.2 ± 2.3 in the nonclosure group before surgery (P = 0.1), 13.8 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 2.2 at 1.8 years (P = 0.99), and 13.6 ± 2.2 and 14.2 ± 2.7 at final follow-up (P = 0.29). The recovery rate of the JOA scores was 56.7 ± 30.0% and 46.7 ± 29.2% at 1.8 years (P = 0.22) and 51.0 ± 32.5 and 57.6 ± 31.1 at the final follow-up (P = 0.42). The subdomains assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire at follow-up were cervical spine function, 68.7 ± 27.5 in the closure group and 67.7 ± 30.0 in the nonclosure group (P = 0.93); upper extremity function, 78.6 ± 24.3 and 87.6 ± 15.4 (P = 0.40); lower extremity function, 69.9 ± 26.0 and 73.9 ± 22.5 (P = 0.68); bladder function, 74.6 ± 22.6 and 84.9 ± 29.2 (P = 0.18); and quality of life, 53.9 ± 25.3 and 56.2 ± 18.1 (P = 0.96). Conclusion: Lamina closure did not significantly impact the long-term surgical outcomes of laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy. Although not statistically significant, the recovery rate tended to decline in the closure group compared with the nonclosure group during the long-term follow-up period, and the utilization of a laminar retention device to prevent the laminar closure should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1288-1291
Number of pages4
JournalSpine
Volume37
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-07-2012
Externally publishedYes

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Spinal Cord Diseases
Orthopedics
Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament
Spondylosis
Upper Extremity
Lower Extremity
Urinary Bladder
Spine
Quality of Life
Equipment and Supplies
Laminoplasty
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Matsumoto, Morio ; Watanabe, Kota ; Hosogane, Naobumi ; Tsuji, Takashi ; Ishii, Ken ; Nakamura, Masaya ; Chiba, Kazuhiro ; Toyama, Yoshiaki. / Impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes of open-door laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy : Minimum 5-year follow-up study. In: Spine. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 15. pp. 1288-1291.
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title = "Impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes of open-door laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy: Minimum 5-year follow-up study",
abstract = "Study Design: A prospective follow-up study. Objective: To elucidate the impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes after open-door laminoplasty. Summary of Background Data: In a previous study, we did not find significant associations between lamina closure and short-term outcomes. Methods: Of the original cohort of 82 patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty, 69 were included in this study (52 men, 17 women; mean age, 60.9 yr; mean follow-up, 6.2 yr; 56 with spondylosis or disc herniation, 13 with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament). Lamina closure was previously observed in 23 of these patients (closure group) but not in 46 (nonclosure group). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire were recorded. Results: The JOA score was 9.9 ± 3.2 in the closure group and 11.2 ± 2.3 in the nonclosure group before surgery (P = 0.1), 13.8 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 2.2 at 1.8 years (P = 0.99), and 13.6 ± 2.2 and 14.2 ± 2.7 at final follow-up (P = 0.29). The recovery rate of the JOA scores was 56.7 ± 30.0{\%} and 46.7 ± 29.2{\%} at 1.8 years (P = 0.22) and 51.0 ± 32.5 and 57.6 ± 31.1 at the final follow-up (P = 0.42). The subdomains assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire at follow-up were cervical spine function, 68.7 ± 27.5 in the closure group and 67.7 ± 30.0 in the nonclosure group (P = 0.93); upper extremity function, 78.6 ± 24.3 and 87.6 ± 15.4 (P = 0.40); lower extremity function, 69.9 ± 26.0 and 73.9 ± 22.5 (P = 0.68); bladder function, 74.6 ± 22.6 and 84.9 ± 29.2 (P = 0.18); and quality of life, 53.9 ± 25.3 and 56.2 ± 18.1 (P = 0.96). Conclusion: Lamina closure did not significantly impact the long-term surgical outcomes of laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy. Although not statistically significant, the recovery rate tended to decline in the closure group compared with the nonclosure group during the long-term follow-up period, and the utilization of a laminar retention device to prevent the laminar closure should be considered.",
author = "Morio Matsumoto and Kota Watanabe and Naobumi Hosogane and Takashi Tsuji and Ken Ishii and Masaya Nakamura and Kazuhiro Chiba and Yoshiaki Toyama",
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Impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes of open-door laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy : Minimum 5-year follow-up study. / Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Hosogane, Naobumi; Tsuji, Takashi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki.

In: Spine, Vol. 37, No. 15, 01.07.2012, p. 1288-1291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes of open-door laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy

T2 - Minimum 5-year follow-up study

AU - Matsumoto, Morio

AU - Watanabe, Kota

AU - Hosogane, Naobumi

AU - Tsuji, Takashi

AU - Ishii, Ken

AU - Nakamura, Masaya

AU - Chiba, Kazuhiro

AU - Toyama, Yoshiaki

PY - 2012/7/1

Y1 - 2012/7/1

N2 - Study Design: A prospective follow-up study. Objective: To elucidate the impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes after open-door laminoplasty. Summary of Background Data: In a previous study, we did not find significant associations between lamina closure and short-term outcomes. Methods: Of the original cohort of 82 patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty, 69 were included in this study (52 men, 17 women; mean age, 60.9 yr; mean follow-up, 6.2 yr; 56 with spondylosis or disc herniation, 13 with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament). Lamina closure was previously observed in 23 of these patients (closure group) but not in 46 (nonclosure group). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire were recorded. Results: The JOA score was 9.9 ± 3.2 in the closure group and 11.2 ± 2.3 in the nonclosure group before surgery (P = 0.1), 13.8 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 2.2 at 1.8 years (P = 0.99), and 13.6 ± 2.2 and 14.2 ± 2.7 at final follow-up (P = 0.29). The recovery rate of the JOA scores was 56.7 ± 30.0% and 46.7 ± 29.2% at 1.8 years (P = 0.22) and 51.0 ± 32.5 and 57.6 ± 31.1 at the final follow-up (P = 0.42). The subdomains assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire at follow-up were cervical spine function, 68.7 ± 27.5 in the closure group and 67.7 ± 30.0 in the nonclosure group (P = 0.93); upper extremity function, 78.6 ± 24.3 and 87.6 ± 15.4 (P = 0.40); lower extremity function, 69.9 ± 26.0 and 73.9 ± 22.5 (P = 0.68); bladder function, 74.6 ± 22.6 and 84.9 ± 29.2 (P = 0.18); and quality of life, 53.9 ± 25.3 and 56.2 ± 18.1 (P = 0.96). Conclusion: Lamina closure did not significantly impact the long-term surgical outcomes of laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy. Although not statistically significant, the recovery rate tended to decline in the closure group compared with the nonclosure group during the long-term follow-up period, and the utilization of a laminar retention device to prevent the laminar closure should be considered.

AB - Study Design: A prospective follow-up study. Objective: To elucidate the impact of lamina closure on long-term outcomes after open-door laminoplasty. Summary of Background Data: In a previous study, we did not find significant associations between lamina closure and short-term outcomes. Methods: Of the original cohort of 82 patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty, 69 were included in this study (52 men, 17 women; mean age, 60.9 yr; mean follow-up, 6.2 yr; 56 with spondylosis or disc herniation, 13 with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament). Lamina closure was previously observed in 23 of these patients (closure group) but not in 46 (nonclosure group). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire were recorded. Results: The JOA score was 9.9 ± 3.2 in the closure group and 11.2 ± 2.3 in the nonclosure group before surgery (P = 0.1), 13.8 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 2.2 at 1.8 years (P = 0.99), and 13.6 ± 2.2 and 14.2 ± 2.7 at final follow-up (P = 0.29). The recovery rate of the JOA scores was 56.7 ± 30.0% and 46.7 ± 29.2% at 1.8 years (P = 0.22) and 51.0 ± 32.5 and 57.6 ± 31.1 at the final follow-up (P = 0.42). The subdomains assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire at follow-up were cervical spine function, 68.7 ± 27.5 in the closure group and 67.7 ± 30.0 in the nonclosure group (P = 0.93); upper extremity function, 78.6 ± 24.3 and 87.6 ± 15.4 (P = 0.40); lower extremity function, 69.9 ± 26.0 and 73.9 ± 22.5 (P = 0.68); bladder function, 74.6 ± 22.6 and 84.9 ± 29.2 (P = 0.18); and quality of life, 53.9 ± 25.3 and 56.2 ± 18.1 (P = 0.96). Conclusion: Lamina closure did not significantly impact the long-term surgical outcomes of laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy. Although not statistically significant, the recovery rate tended to decline in the closure group compared with the nonclosure group during the long-term follow-up period, and the utilization of a laminar retention device to prevent the laminar closure should be considered.

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