Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study

Akiko Tamakoshi, Miyuki Kawado, Kotaro Ozasa, Koji Tamakoshi, Yingsong Lin, Kiyoko Yagyu, Shogo Kikuchi, Shuji Hashimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A number of lifestyle factors, including smoking and drinking, are known to be independently associated with all-cause mortality. However, it might be more effective in motivating the public to adopt a healthier lifestyle if the combined effect of several lifestyle factors on all-cause mortality could be demonstrated in a straightforward manner. Methods: We examined the combined effects of 6 healthy lifestyle behaviors on all-cause mortality by estimating life expectancies at 40 and 60 years of age among 62106 participants in a prospective cohort study with a 14.5-year follow-up. The healthy behaviors selected were current nonsmoking, not heavily drinking, walking 1 hour or more per day, sleeping 6.5 to 7.4 hours per day, eating green leafy vegetables almost daily, and having a BMI between 18.5 to 24.9. Results: At age 40, we found a 10.3-year increase in life expectancy for men and a 8.3-year increase for women who had all 6 healthy behaviors, as compared with those who had only 0 to 2 healthy behaviors. Increases of 9.6 and 8.2 years were observed for men and women, respectively, at age 60 with all 6 healthy behaviors. When comparing currently nonsmoking individuals with 0 to 1 healthy behaviors, the life expectancy of smokers was shorter in both men and women, even if they maintained all 5 other healthy behaviors. Conclusions: Among individuals aged 40 and 60 years, maintaining all 6 healthy lifestyle factors was associated with longer life expectancy. Smokers should be encouraged to quit smoking first and then to maintain or adopt the other 5 lifestyle factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of epidemiology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03-11-2010

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Life Expectancy
Life Style
Japan
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Drinking
Mortality
Vegetables
Walking
Eating
Prospective Studies
Healthy Lifestyle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Tamakoshi, Akiko ; Kawado, Miyuki ; Ozasa, Kotaro ; Tamakoshi, Koji ; Lin, Yingsong ; Yagyu, Kiyoko ; Kikuchi, Shogo ; Hashimoto, Shuji. / Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese : Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study. In: Journal of epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 370-376.
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Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese : Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study. / Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kawado, Miyuki; Ozasa, Kotaro; Tamakoshi, Koji; Lin, Yingsong; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Kikuchi, Shogo; Hashimoto, Shuji.

In: Journal of epidemiology, Vol. 20, No. 5, 03.11.2010, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tamakoshi, Akiko

AU - Kawado, Miyuki

AU - Ozasa, Kotaro

AU - Tamakoshi, Koji

AU - Lin, Yingsong

AU - Yagyu, Kiyoko

AU - Kikuchi, Shogo

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

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