Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese

Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study

Akiko Tamakoshi, Miyuki Kawado, Kotaro Ozasa, Koji Tamakoshi, Yingsong Lin, Kiyoko Yagyu, Shogo Kikuchi, Shuji Hashimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A number of lifestyle factors, including smoking and drinking, are known to be independently associated with all-cause mortality. However, it might be more effective in motivating the public to adopt a healthier lifestyle if the combined effect of several lifestyle factors on all-cause mortality could be demonstrated in a straightforward manner. Methods: We examined the combined effects of 6 healthy lifestyle behaviors on all-cause mortality by estimating life expectancies at 40 and 60 years of age among 62106 participants in a prospective cohort study with a 14.5-year follow-up. The healthy behaviors selected were current nonsmoking, not heavily drinking, walking 1 hour or more per day, sleeping 6.5 to 7.4 hours per day, eating green leafy vegetables almost daily, and having a BMI between 18.5 to 24.9. Results: At age 40, we found a 10.3-year increase in life expectancy for men and a 8.3-year increase for women who had all 6 healthy behaviors, as compared with those who had only 0 to 2 healthy behaviors. Increases of 9.6 and 8.2 years were observed for men and women, respectively, at age 60 with all 6 healthy behaviors. When comparing currently nonsmoking individuals with 0 to 1 healthy behaviors, the life expectancy of smokers was shorter in both men and women, even if they maintained all 5 other healthy behaviors. Conclusions: Among individuals aged 40 and 60 years, maintaining all 6 healthy lifestyle factors was associated with longer life expectancy. Smokers should be encouraged to quit smoking first and then to maintain or adopt the other 5 lifestyle factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03-11-2010

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Life Expectancy
Life Style
Japan
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Drinking
Mortality
Vegetables
Walking
Eating
Prospective Studies
Healthy Lifestyle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Tamakoshi, Akiko ; Kawado, Miyuki ; Ozasa, Kotaro ; Tamakoshi, Koji ; Lin, Yingsong ; Yagyu, Kiyoko ; Kikuchi, Shogo ; Hashimoto, Shuji. / Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese : Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 370-376.
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Impact of smoking and other lifestyle factors on life expectancy among Japanese : Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study. / Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kawado, Miyuki; Ozasa, Kotaro; Tamakoshi, Koji; Lin, Yingsong; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Kikuchi, Shogo; Hashimoto, Shuji.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 20, No. 5, 03.11.2010, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Ozasa, Kotaro

AU - Tamakoshi, Koji

AU - Lin, Yingsong

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AU - Kikuchi, Shogo

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

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